Japanese food – NSMS 10 http://nsms10.com/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 10:44:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nsms10.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-71-150x150.png Japanese food – NSMS 10 http://nsms10.com/ 32 32 Meet the broker who brought Industry City and Chelsea Market to life https://nsms10.com/meet-the-broker-who-brought-industry-city-and-chelsea-market-to-life/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://nsms10.com/meet-the-broker-who-brought-industry-city-and-chelsea-market-to-life/ He left law to work as a stockbroker at Cushman and was walking through the Meatpacking District in 1997 with the woman he would later marry when he noticed the building that would become Chelsea Market. The building was originally the site of a Nabisco factory where the Oreo was invented. It was purchased in […]]]>

He left law to work as a stockbroker at Cushman and was walking through the Meatpacking District in 1997 with the woman he would later marry when he noticed the building that would become Chelsea Market.

The building was originally the site of a Nabisco factory where the Oreo was invented. It was purchased in the 1990s by Irwin Cohen, who planned to turn it into a food market.

“That’s when I said, ‘I know what I want to be when I grow up,'” Somoza said.

In 2002, he represented a partnership that acquired 85 10th Ave., now part of Chelsea Market. Cohen, the mastermind behind the concept, then asked him to join his Chelsea Market team.

“Irwin taught me everything I know,” Somoza said. “He was the godfather of a lot of this stuff.”

Several years ago, real estate investment firms Belvedere Capital and Jamestown took a look at Industry City and asked Somoza to join them in creating the city’s next large-scale indoor market.

What’s your secret sauce for finding tenants?

I think I’m a good conversationalist. I think people like to have a beer with me. I genuinely care about them. I will show up at their restaurant and buy things from their store, follow them on Instagram.

I try not to sound like a broker, because I’m not.

Why do tenants choose Industry City?

We have created a really interesting place. It’s such a good mix of retailers. We have a food hall, a blacksmith, a local Thai. I work at a cobbler right now. I always wanted a cobbler in Industry City. It’s a lost art, and few people do it anymore.

When we bring people in to see the space, I think there’s an 80% chance of closing the deal.

How did you celebrate your first big deal?

Concluding a deal is quite anticlimactic. I love the process, the struggle and doing it. I always had the impression that afterwards, I moved on to something else. I’ve had a million steak dinners, and they all mix.

In 2003, at Cushman & Wakefield, we consolidated the Thompson Financial office. It was the first big case I worked on. Closing involved steaks, and that was really fun, but it was a three-year process to get that deal done. He died twice and there were many disappointments. I used the money to go on a trip and buy a BMW.

What is the most complicated transaction you have worked on?

Japan Village in Industry City. I used to travel a lot in Japan with Youngwoo & Associates for business, and I always liked Japanese food. When I got involved in Industry City, I came to my first meeting with a list of things I wanted, which included a Japanese grocery store.

We called various places, like Tony Yashida’s Sunrise Mart, who we ended up negotiating with.

The complication of the project was bringing all of these companies together in a cohesive way. You had to feel like you were in Japan.

This case [with Yashida] That’s what really made Industry City famous, because it was immediately the biggest traffic driver for us. The entrance to Japan Village is the busiest entrance to Industry City.

It now has various components, like a grocery store, a section of ramen, udon, sushi, and soba food stalls that look a lot like those in Tokyo. Next to it is a izakaya, a Japanese bar and liquor store. On the second floor are all the durable goods, like pottery, anime, and cosmetics, from Japan.

We took about a year to make the lease. Two and a half years to build and open it. There were times when Tony and I almost thought it was too risky. He died and returned several times during this period.

Why did you choose to join Industry City?

In a way, he chose me. I had worked with a lot of partners, and that’s what I do: adapt old and historic buildings past their prime. Recreating locations is just super fun.

Watching it the first time was a big challenge. I love buildings; I was driven by them for years as a kid and always wondered what was going on with them.

There will always be something to watch next.

These projects have a bow to them. When it stabilizes and works on its own, it’s less interesting and fun for me. I’m not interested in being the custodian of a project. I want to develop.

Which tenant is your favorite?

Japan Village is my favorite concept, but there are a lot of great people here in Industry City. They are more than just ground floor tenants.

This project really needs someone who wants to be part of the community, values ​​it, is a true partner, and is in the trenches with you every day.

]]>
Kitchen Shrink: How to Gracefully Slip into Fall Foods https://nsms10.com/kitchen-shrink-how-to-gracefully-slip-into-fall-foods/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 22:28:48 +0000 https://nsms10.com/kitchen-shrink-how-to-gracefully-slip-into-fall-foods/ As we move into fall, truly my favorite season, our body clocks, appetites, and palates need to reset to shorter, cooler days, heartier foods, and earthier, more robust flavors. I recently met an acquaintance, who was delighted with her spring trip to India where she was training to become an Ayurvedic healer, and had gleaned […]]]>

As we move into fall, truly my favorite season, our body clocks, appetites, and palates need to reset to shorter, cooler days, heartier foods, and earthier, more robust flavors. I recently met an acquaintance, who was delighted with her spring trip to India where she was training to become an Ayurvedic healer, and had gleaned some enlightening tips on diet and herbs. I asked her to share some gems with me, and she simply told me to listen to your body and embrace the seasons. Well, this season offers an abundance of exciting fruits, roots, seeds, squashes and greens to inspire us all to become our own Ayurvedic healers to achieve balance and well-being. Here’s how.

Catherine Kaufman

(File photo)

Give salads a fall twist by incorporating brain-boosting, antioxidant-rich dark leafy greens into the mix. Start with kale, the king of leafy greens and a super methyl donor packed with essential cancer-fighting nutrients, whether it’s Curly, Lacinato, or Dino varieties with sturdy stems, stiff leaves, and great taste. strong and earthy. For a peppery zip, do baby arugula, some sweet and nutty undertones try the tender Mache, a bite of bitters, choose Frisee, or for crispy and rich in vitamins A and K, then hail, Caesar with romaine leaves. Or add some interesting texture and color with a good jaw workout with a handful of charred shredded savoy, napa, red or brussels sprouts with a sassy balsamic glaze. We are just getting started.

Mix a variety of raw or roasted seeds or nuts in your salad bowl, from nuggets and sunflower seeds to Marcona almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, pistachios and pecans for a good crunch, a dose of protein and a zing that stimulates the heart and the brain. . There is more. Sprinkle dried cranberries over green salads, tabbouleh or pilafs for a burst of flavor, a pop of color and a hearty chew. This little powerhouse has a mother lode of vitamins A, B, and C, plus anti-stick properties that make this tangy little fall darling the urinary tract’s best friend. To top it all off with a touch of fall, gently heat dressing or salad dressing, especially oil- and citrus-based ones, for a warm, comforting wilted salad on chilly nights.

As we phase out summer stone fruits, an abundance of crisp, juicy apples ranging from plump-lipped Granny Smith’s to luscious Honeycrisps fill the produce aisles and farmers markets. These versatile fall favorites are equally (if not more) delicious in hot compotes, flaky strudels and hot, raw ciders. Delicately sweet and elegant pears, including Bosc, Bartlett, Comice, Anjou and Asian varieties announce the season on charcuterie boards, poached in brandy or sliced ​​in salads.

How about a romantic date with a Middle Eastern delicacy? Dates are a sweet autumnal treat, whether it’s amber-skinned Deglet Noors, creamy, mouth-watering honeyed dates, chewy, plump Medjools, or tiny Barhis with smoky candy essence. These waxy, nutrient-rich wonders add moistness, chewiness and caramelized notes to a variety of side dishes, salads, stuffings, quick breads, cookies or snacks smothered whole in creamy tahini and rich in protein.

Let’s cut to the chase with Autumn’s iconic Technicolors, especially garnet yams or Okinawa purple sweet potatoes, turnips, parsnips, carrots of all hues, rutabagas, as well as ruby ​​beets and browned to add a sweet dessert quality to dishes in every way. These hearty roots also provide tons of antioxidants, from beta-carotene to anthocyanins, to detoxify, sharpen, repair and defend various parts of the body.

Now let’s play squash. The cornucopia of fall squash in kitschy shapes and vibrant hues delights the eyes and palates of the most carnivorous among us. All my cookbook winners, whether it’s tender golden acorn squash with rich nutty undertones; the most divine silky-smooth orange-fleshed Butternut with a dash of ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon and autumnal cloves; the funky spaghetti squash that blossoms into a noodle-like mound of sprigs when cooked; the mild-mannered Delicata reminiscent of sweet potatoes; Japanese kabocha featuring chewy flesh much like chestnuts with a pungent, earthy kick; or the bold, giant Hubbard with sweet, dark orange flesh reminiscent of a sugar pumpkin.

Whichever variety you choose, this low-calorie botanical fruit contains a rich storehouse of immune-boosting antioxidants, plus a host of vitamins and minerals to support heart and eye health, relieve painful joints with a supply of anti-inflammatory omega-3s. , and reduce the signs of aging. Their shells can be hollowed out and stuffed, or used as an edible tureen for cold or hot fall soups. Bake, grill, roast, steam, sauté or mash. Swap pasta for butternut lasagna, toss spaghetti squash with turkey meatballs and marinara sauce, or kale and pistachio pesto for a lighter, carb-friendly casserole.

Alas, this month my wonderful father-in-law passed away at the glorious age of 94. We reflected on and celebrated a full, rich and healthy life that we can attribute to a philosophy of gratitude, love of family and moderation. in food, drink and exercise. And while he was a pharmacist by trade, Dad believed in the teachings of Hippocrates, “make food your medicine”. Every time he came to visit us from New York, I made this elegant dessert mixing acorn squash with other goodies for a tipsy, indulgent, yet healthy treat. In memory of Burt Kaufman who was really satisfied with a single scoop of vanilla ice cream!

Drunk chocolate squash mousse

—1 large acorn squash (halved, seeds removed)

—2/3 cup dark chocolate syrup or melted bittersweet chocolate

—1/3 cup dried cranberries soaked in 3 tablespoons dark rum or fine cognac

—Orange blossom honey (to taste)

—1 cup heavy whipping cream (or dairy-free whipped cream)

— Whip the cream until peaks form. Put aside.

—In a saucepan half-filled with water, bring the squash to a boil and simmer until tender. Scoop out the flesh and mash it in a food processor.

—In a mixing bowl, combine the squash, syrup, honey, cranberries and liqueur. Gently fold in the whipped cream. Serve in martini glasses and garnish with chocolate shavings.

]]>
Ramen King Keisuke Launches All Over Southern California, Serving Japan’s ‘Best’ Ramen https://nsms10.com/ramen-king-keisuke-launches-all-over-southern-california-serving-japans-best-ramen/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 19:31:38 +0000 https://nsms10.com/ramen-king-keisuke-launches-all-over-southern-california-serving-japans-best-ramen/ Los Angeles, CA (RestaurantNews.com) King Keisuke Ramen announced the launch of its chain’s flagship storefront of fast-casual ramen restaurants opening across the United States. Led by Tokyo Ramen Champion, chef Keisuke Takeda will serve up his award-winning Tonkotsu Broth Ramen, which is considered the “best” ramen in all of Japan. The secret to its world […]]]>

Ramen King Keisuke Launches All Over Southern California, Serving Japan's 'Best' RamenLos Angeles, CA (RestaurantNews.com) King Keisuke Ramen announced the launch of its chain’s flagship storefront of fast-casual ramen restaurants opening across the United States. Led by Tokyo Ramen Champion, chef Keisuke Takeda will serve up his award-winning Tonkotsu Broth Ramen, which is considered the “best” ramen in all of Japan.

The secret to its world famous ramen? Bone broth which is boiled for over 10 hours to ensure the flavors are fully absorbed and fused into the dish, resulting in a luscious, silky bowl of the most satisfying ramen soup. Bone broth offers great nutritional value and is recognized as one of the best sources of natural collagen in the world. Ramen King Keisuke will also serve its famous lobster broth ramen, a dish that has yet to be experienced by the US market and guarantees consumers a taste adventure. For vegan lovers, Chef Keisuke has created a distinctive vegan potato and mushroom broth ramen exclusively for this market.

“It’s not your typical college roommate’s ramen, but it’s in his budget. For just $9.95, customers will be able to get the best ramen in Japan,” said Dolores Tay, CEO of the brand. “Our mission is to serve authentic Japanese cuisine at great prices in an ultra-efficient way.”

Ramen King Keisuke has spent over 2 years revamping the traditional ramen restaurant to suit the US market by incorporating the latest technology and operational efficiencies to deliver the first “lightweight” restaurant. Customers are greeted with an ordering kiosk to grab their own selections and served a piping hot bowl of delicious ramen within 5 minutes. Meanwhile, the soon-to-be-launched mobile app allows customers to order from home or office with just a few taps. This comprehensive digitized approach ensures scalability for ambitious expansion while maintaining optimal food quality, especially during this tight labor market. “We saw a gap in the US market to create the first national ramen brand in a category without a dominant leader,” Ms. Tay said. “We want to serve delicious, authentic Japanese ramen at the best value in all of America, introducing it to people who have never tried it before.”

“Our restaurant’s clean design language magically transports our customers across the Pacific to the latest contemporary-style ramen restaurant in Japan,” said Ms. Tay. “From our successful ramen restaurants in Singapore and Japan, we understand the importance of creating a modern aesthetic that matches the Ramen King Keisuke brand and meets the needs of our customers and creates an immersive and authentic dining experience for our customers. .”

The first location is set to open September 24 in Monterey Park, followed by the Century City Westfield mall in early October. Thirteen additional locations are expected to open throughout the year in various locations, including Farmers Market in Fairfax, Marina Del Rey, Studio City, Torrance, Commerce, Anaheim, Brea, Westminster, Mission Viejo, Cabazon, Del Mar, Carlsbad and Mission Valley. . Beginning in Southern California, Ramen King plans to expand across the United States in the near future.

About Ramen King Keisuke

Led by Tokyo Ramen Champion, chef Keisuke Takeda will serve his award-winning Ramen Tonkotsu Broth, considered the “best” ramen in Japan. This new brand of fast-casual ramen restaurants incorporates the latest technology to deliver an ultra-efficient ramen dining experience.

At Ramen King Keisuke, the quality goes beyond your average everyday ramen. With the Tokyo Ramen Champion on board, creating their product from the ground up, you won’t find another ramen restaurant like this. Ramen King prides itself on offering authentic Southern California Japanese cuisine at a great value. For more information, visit https://ramenking.co. Follow the brand on Instagram, TikTok and Facebook.

Media Contact:
Matt Kovacs
Blaze PR
mkovacs@blazepr.com

]]>
Sushi Ten offers impressive take-out Japanese cuisine at affordable prices https://nsms10.com/sushi-ten-offers-impressive-take-out-japanese-cuisine-at-affordable-prices/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 10:03:41 +0000 https://nsms10.com/sushi-ten-offers-impressive-take-out-japanese-cuisine-at-affordable-prices/ G. A. Benton Do you have a take-out sushi restaurant offering high quality dishes at an affordable price? If not, I strongly suggest you take a look at Sushi Ten, the local reference for such an operation. After closing for nearly six months for a largely cosmetic makeover, Sushi Ten, 1159 Old Henderson Road, reopened […]]]>

G. A. Benton

Do you have a take-out sushi restaurant offering high quality dishes at an affordable price? If not, I strongly suggest you take a look at Sushi Ten, the local reference for such an operation.

After closing for nearly six months for a largely cosmetic makeover, Sushi Ten, 1159 Old Henderson Road, reopened a few months ago at the Japan Marketplace at the Kenny Center – a sprawling complex of terrific related businesses that includes Akai Hana , Belle’s Breads, Tensuke Express and the Tensuke Market.

Unsurprisingly, Sushi Ten’s offerings – which include several vegan rolls – are still impressive, the setting is just different. Attached to Tensuke Market via a ramp at the back of the store, Ten now occupies a streamlined, small, and bright space that’s essentially an order counter connected to a bustling but spotless open kitchen with calm, focused workers. Attractive, modern touches are provided by the wood and light-colored tiles that range from sparkling white to stone mosaic to domino-patterned orange.

After:Excellent service, top notch food and drink on the menu at Subourbon Southern Kitchen & Spirits

Indoor seating is not offered, but customers can transport their food to a table inside the nearby Tensuke Express, which has a cafeteria-style setup. There are also a few outdoor tables lining the entrance to Ten’s parking lot, and benches are scattered throughout the Japanese Market Park.

Shrimp, amberjack and tuna nigiri at Sushi Ten.

Ten’s concise website and accurate online menu, which offers multiple photos and clear explanations of sushi styles, is representative of the well-oiled, no-frills restaurant as a whole. These features also make it easier to compile a pickup order.

If you’ve just dropped by, expect a helpful waiter to facilitate your ordering process and then text you when your food is ready, which in my case was still less than the 20 minute wait time at 30 minutes indicated.

A good place to start is nigiri – protein draped over mounds of rice. These stripped down pieces show how Ten stands out from the pack.

Tensuke Market's sushi department has moved to the store next door and is now called Sushi Ten.  Both stores are located at the Japan Marketplace at the Kenny Center.  Sushi Ten prepares sushi to take away and for the Tensuke market.

For example, choosing a nigiri with arguably the most popular raw fish for sushi—tuna ($3.40) and salmon ($3)—brought firm, sweet vinegary rice (getting that right doesn’t matter). is no mean feat) sprinkled with wasabi and garnished with thick but silky cool-tasting tuna and buttery salmon respectively.

The smooth and sweet shrimp nigiri ($2.75) was equally adorable and the king salmon ($3.35), a weekend special, was deliciously extra buttery.

The stronger-tasting amberjack ($3.50) is often a miss elsewhere, but here it’s pretty good. Adventurous diners might also enjoy the Sesame Boiled Scallop, similar to a raw oyster ($3.30).

After:Ena’s Caribbean Kitchen, a Linden landmark for Jamaican cuisine

Chirashi Bowl at Sushi Ten

Not feeling adventurous? Anyone who loves eggs will dig the puffy, sugary omelet-like boards on the crowd-pleasing tamago nigiri ($2).

Ten’s maki selection – the familiar nori-bound wheels with innards surrounded by rice – includes fun, six-piece vegetable-centric rolls with toppings such as: Sour Plum & Cucumber ($3.55) – Preserved Plum trendy and tangy (aka “umeboshi”) in sauce form with the effective counterpoint of fresh, crunchy cucumber; squash ($3.30) – chunks of kanpyo (gourd) with fishy textures and appealing sweet and savory flavors; pickled radish ($3.25) – daikon with its telltale funk and crunch.

Sushi Ten makes sushi for takeout and for the nearby Tensuke Market in the Kenny Center Japanese Market.

Something more elaborate? Two of my favorite dynamic multi-component builds were: Spicy Crunchy Salmon Roll ($7.25) – rice roll on the outside (uramaki) with delicious fish, sesame seeds, crispy tempura flakes , green onion and just enough spicy mayonnaise; and the similar but much bigger and even better Columbus roll with tuna ($15) — oversized uramaki discs filled with bountiful ground tuna, pristine avocado, crunchy cucumber, sesame seeds, and spicy mayonnaise.

]]>
Very invasive Japanese knotweed is difficult to control https://nsms10.com/very-invasive-japanese-knotweed-is-difficult-to-control/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 09:28:48 +0000 https://nsms10.com/very-invasive-japanese-knotweed-is-difficult-to-control/ You probably see pretty hedge-like plants with mounds of white flowers growing along streams and highways this time of year. This is the highly invasive plant called Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica or Polygonum cuspidatum), a shrubby perennial herb in the buckwheat family that was introduced from Japan in the late 1800s as an ornamental plant […]]]>

You probably see pretty hedge-like plants with mounds of white flowers growing along streams and highways this time of year.

This is the highly invasive plant called Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica or Polygonum cuspidatum), a shrubby perennial herb in the buckwheat family that was introduced from Japan in the late 1800s as an ornamental plant and to stabilize banks.

Knotweed quickly became naturalized across the country. Once established, populations are extremely persistent and difficult to control.

Growing up to 11 feet tall, the sturdy, hollow, bamboo-like stems of Japanese knotweed have red or purple nodes where the leaves are attached. Leaf-bearing portions of the stem appear to zigzag from node to node to form dense thickets that exclude native vegetation and dramatically alter natural ecosystems.

The large alternate leaves (3 to 6 inches long), spade or heart shaped, are distinctive. Tiny aromatic white or greenish-white five-petalled flowers develop in August and September and form numerous linear clusters that form a mass of white on the plant when in full bloom.

A Japanese knotweed seedling (Courtesy of Dave Jackson)

The plant is pollinated by insects. The frozen stems take on a bronze color and can remain upright all winter. Emerging in early spring, the young growth is particularly bright red or purple and ends in numerous curled leaves that are distinctly triangular.

Manual, mechanical, and chemical methods are all helpful to varying degrees in knotweed control. Removing or killing plants will provide increased light to the site, which can lead to increased shoots the following year. Prepare to monitor and control these outbreaks for several years.

As with all invasive species, Japanese knotweed is most effectively controlled by recognizing its appearance early and removing isolated plants before they begin to spread. Manual control requires special care because any living part of the plant (1/2 inch or more) can germinate. Plant parts should be disposed of properly and should not enter waterways. Stems and roots must be contained or dried out with little or no contact with soil or they may sprout.

Do not compost plant parts. Digging or pulling (uprooting) will remove part of the root system but not all of it. Pull the root crown and as much root as possible. Whenever new shoots are seen (watch for them after a week and at least 20 feet from the plant), uproot them and get as many roots as possible. This method is only feasible on very small patches.

Cutting alone is not an effective removal approach. However, cutting before a herbicide application can be very helpful. Cut in June about 2 inches above ground level (between lowest nodes) and wait at least 8 weeks after cutting to treat re-growing plants with herbicide; Knotweed regrowth will be much shorter than if it hadn’t been cut, and the rhizomes will be forced to redirect their energy reserves to regrowth instead of expanding their underground network.

Typically, knotweed regrows 2-5 feet tall during the 8-week window after cutting, but this waiting period is critical – if you apply a herbicide such as Round-up too soon after cutting, the herbicide will not be effectively transferred to the rhizomes. (Always read the herbicide label and wear protective clothing when handling hazardous chemicals)

Hand cutting, mowing or other methods are not recommended due to the ability of plants to propagate from fragments. If this is the only option, be careful not to spread the plant pieces out and plan to cut several times a year for several years. This method is very inefficient and should only be used if no other option is available

Dee Dee Kerscher is a volunteer Penn State Extension Master Gardener and Horticulture Program Assistant in Berks County.

September Spotted Lantern Update

Do not panic: the dappled lanterns tend to swarm in September. Research has shown that this may be due to the need to find food. With prolonged intensive feeding on the same trees, such as the tree of heaven, the food resource may be depleted and this motivates them to move on to find other suitable food. This behavior is short-lived, lasting a few days.

Facts to remember:

• They do not bite, sting or attack people or pets.

• They are non-toxic if ingested by pets.

• They do not try to enter your homes during the winter.

• Research shows they do not kill trees.

• They feed on plant matter, not fruits or vegetables.

• Examine all vehicles and equipment for insects before travelling.

• Egg laying begins in September, look for gray masses like putty.

• Scrape egg masses into plastic bags containing alcohol or hand sanitizer and destroy them.

• Adults will persist to a hard freeze.

• Avoid home remedies.

To report sightings of spotted lantern flies, even in quarantine areas, call 888-422-3359.

For all the latest updates, visit https://extension.psu.edu/spotted-lanternfly-management-guide.

The Berks County Extension offices at the Agricultural Center, 1238 County Welfare Road, Suite 110, Canton of Bern, are open for walk-in visits and phone calls (610-378-1327) from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The garden hotline (berksmg@psu.edu) is always ready to answer all gardening questions.

]]>
The Wongchuking family builds modern Bulacan communities https://nsms10.com/the-wongchuking-family-builds-modern-bulacan-communities/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 12:10:00 +0000 https://nsms10.com/the-wongchuking-family-builds-modern-bulacan-communities/ The Wongchuking family, which sold the cigarette business of Mighty Corp. in 2017, reinvests its money in the development of modern and well-planned communities in the province of Bulacan. “This is my vision – to create self-sustaining communities,” Czark Mak Corp. Chairman and President Caesar Wongchuking said in an interview at the opening of modern […]]]>

The Wongchuking family, which sold the cigarette business of Mighty Corp. in 2017, reinvests its money in the development of modern and well-planned communities in the province of Bulacan.

“This is my vision – to create self-sustaining communities,” Czark Mak Corp. Chairman and President Caesar Wongchuking said in an interview at the opening of modern restaurant Café de Margaux and Acro Residences, a 102-room hotel at T12 Polo. Land Industrial Zones in Tabang, Guiguinto, Bulacan.

Wongchuking, who is also the chief operating officer of Wong Chu King Holdings Inc., said he envisions T12, a 22-hectare property near MacArthur Highway that the family acquired in 2017, as a township with components industrial, commercial and residential.

Angelo (left) and Keith Wongchuking (right) mentor chef Neil Anthony Arcilla at Café de Margaux

His son Angelo said T12 was originally an industrial park with warehouses. “But we have seen the growth potential of Guiguinto in terms of restaurants and commercial activities,” he said.

T12 now has around 66 warehouses with an average area of ​​1,000 square meters each; Acro Residences which has become one of the largest hotels in the province of Bulacan; Café de Margaux, which has a café and restaurant; an upscale Japanese restaurant called Mount Fuji; and a gas station.

T12’s industrial tenants include Japan Tobacco Inc., which bought the Mighty brand for 46.8 billion pesos in 2017, a Japanese railway supplier, a telecommunications SIM card supplier, a bottler, a furniture manufacturer, traders in sugar and fast-moving consumer goods. wholesalers. Sapporo Ice and Cold Storage, also owned by the Wongchuking family, also has facilities in the complex.

Czark Mak plans the commercial development of an additional 10 hectares. It will soon set up a large Chinese restaurant, a bar and a restaurant on the top floor of the three-story hotel, a convenience store and other commercial spaces. It also targets the construction of a residential condominium building.

“Eventually, we will move into mid-rise residential development,” Caesar Wongchuking said.

The company has spent around 1.5 billion pesos to develop T12 over the past five years and plans to invest more to achieve its vision for the township that will help attract more investors and visitors to the town of Guiguinto.

Guiguinto Mayor Agatha Paula Cruz thanked the Wongchuking family for seeing the potential in the city’s previously empty land and providing much-needed investment to develop it. “This will create important jobs for our residents. I hope it will inspire others to come up with developments like this that will become the local engine of economic development,” she said.

Angelo said the family is investing in the province of Bulacan where La Campana Fabrica de Tabacos Inc., the predecessor of Mighty Corp., established tobacco threshing and curing facilities in the 1940s. “It was based on the research and the fact that our family has always been close to Bulacan. We started in Malolos, but after research, there is huge potential for industrial and commercial activities in Bulacan, and not to mention that the airport would be built in the town of Bulakan, just 10 minutes from the T12 complex”, a- he declared.

Acro Residences, a 102-room hotel in the T12 Polo Land Industrial Estates in Tabang, Guiguinto

“We are very confident about the potential of Bulacan, especially Guiguinto, and we now have good restaurants, starting with the Japanese restaurant Mount Fuji and now Café de Margaux,” Angelo said.

Besides T12, Czark Mak is also developing a 30 hectare property called Polaris Industrial Estates along the Doña Remedios Trinidad highway in Barangay Tarcan, Baliuag, Bulacan.

Polaris Industrial Estate, which is registered with the Board of Investments, is a domestic industrial estate whose primary purpose is to develop, sell or lease industrial, commercial and residential properties. It recently obtained a permit from the Department of Human Settlements and Urban Development for the development of housing projects.

Czark Mak has already spent 500 million pesos on Polaris road development. The complex is equipped with amenities aimed at providing an efficient and convenient means of doing business. “With the new Manila International Airport soon to be developed, Bulacan is set to be the country’s next business hub, with Baliuag as its main gateway,” the company said.

Czark Mak works in the real estate, industrial leasing, manufacturing, agribusiness, food and hospitality, and technology industries.

The Wongchuking family also owns various properties and businesses across the country. Their family compound spans over a hectare near Makati Circuit where land values ​​exceed 130,000 pesos per square meter.

]]>
Washdyke cafe got off to a good start at South Canterbury’s first food festival https://nsms10.com/washdyke-cafe-got-off-to-a-good-start-at-south-canterburys-first-food-festival/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 05:39:00 +0000 https://nsms10.com/washdyke-cafe-got-off-to-a-good-start-at-south-canterburys-first-food-festival/ Venture Timaru/provided PiqueNique Café cook Anna McDonald holds the cafe’s coconut custard with strawberry compote and keto granola. The district’s annual Outstanding Food Festival got off to a flying start for a Washdyke cafe making its debut, while another participating business reported selling out on the first day. Armed with baked coconut cream and a […]]]>
PiqueNique Café cook Anna McDonald holds the cafe's coconut custard with strawberry compote and keto granola.

Venture Timaru/provided

PiqueNique Café cook Anna McDonald holds the cafe’s coconut custard with strawberry compote and keto granola.

The district’s annual Outstanding Food Festival got off to a flying start for a Washdyke cafe making its debut, while another participating business reported selling out on the first day.

Armed with baked coconut cream and a Japanese monkfish sandwich, the PiqueNique Café is hoping to get noticed at the South Canterbury Outstanding Food Festival (Scoff) 2022, with the owner saying his dishes have been already proven popular on day one.

While, in downtown Timaru, the Pasty Parlor sold out its first batches of its kornish pastry, its social media page says.

He reportedly has more to sell at the Timaru Craft Farmers Market on Saturdays at his stall in Canterbury Clanger, the post said.

READ MORE:
* South Canterbury Outstanding Food Festival feedback is positive
* What’s New in South Canterbury: 1-3 October 2021
* What’s New in South Canterbury: 24-26 September
* Time to make fun of South Canterbury’s outstanding food

Cafe owner Robert Jacobs says the festival comes just in time for the company to introduce the internationally-inspired Japanese monkfish sandwich that will be part of its spring menu.

“We change our menu every three months. Most of the cafe’s dishes are influenced by international cuisine with a hint of kiwi,” Jacobs said.

“With the custard, we wanted to create a dish that would feed everyone keeping in mind the dietary restrictions some might have.”

PiqueNique Café owner Robert Jacobs said that

AIMAN AMERUL MUNER / Stuff

PiqueNique Café owner Robert Jacobs said “a good number” of his two Scoff dishes had already sold out on Friday.

Jacobs said “a good number” of the two Scoff dishes sold out on Friday and there were good reviews of the dishes.

“We had a lot of success with the dishes. I was in the kitchen, so I didn’t hear any comments myself, but the best I can say is that the plates were returned with no food,” he said.

PiqueNique is one of 55 restaurants and 20 producers from the Mackenzie, Waimate and Timaru districts registered for the festival, now in its third year, which runs until September 30.

The event was designed to “revive” the hospitality sector after the impacts of Covid-19 and promote the region’s economic drivers: agriculture and food production.

Scoff is about the flavor collaboration between restaurants and producers in creating a new menu using South Canterbury produce.

The 2022 festival has been extended for five days and also includes a produce market and a $2,000 prize for a loyal “thrasher.”

Sando with Japanese monkfish and sweet potato fries seasoned with togarashi from the PiqueNique Cafe.

Venture Timaru/provided

Sando with Japanese monkfish and sweet potato fries seasoned with togarashi from the PiqueNique Cafe.

Earlier this month Venture Timaru COO Di Hay said mockingbirds can get a loyalty card stamped when they visit a Scoff restaurant.

“When they have five stamps, they leave them at a participating restaurant and enter the grand prize draw which is worth just over $2,000,” Hay said.

“Also new this year is the Scoff Market, which is a showcase of our food producers at the Timaru Artisan Farmers Market on September 17.”

]]>
VOX POPULI: Given the global food situation, it’s time to encourage rice again https://nsms10.com/vox-populi-given-the-global-food-situation-its-time-to-encourage-rice-again/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 05:33:00 +0000 https://nsms10.com/vox-populi-given-the-global-food-situation-its-time-to-encourage-rice-again/ Author Kozaburo Arashiyama, an avid rice fan, objects to the common usage of the term ‘shinmai’ (literally ‘new rice’) to refer to a novice. In the past, he claims in his essay, a novice was called a ‘shinmae’ – ‘shin’ meaning ‘new’ and ‘mae’ short for ‘maekake’ (apron). In other words, a novice was someone […]]]>

Author Kozaburo Arashiyama, an avid rice fan, objects to the common usage of the term ‘shinmai’ (literally ‘new rice’) to refer to a novice.

In the past, he claims in his essay, a novice was called a ‘shinmae’ – ‘shin’ meaning ‘new’ and ‘mae’ short for ‘maekake’ (apron). In other words, a novice was someone who wore a new apron.

But shinmae has become shinmai over time, and Arashiyama is annoyed that it’s “disrespectful to new rice”.

It also gives the thumbs down to the idiom “hiyameshi-gui” (literally, “eating cold rice”), which refers to someone who is looked down upon or given the cold shoulder.

“Why ‘omusubi’ (rice balls) are perfectly good when cold, and chilled ‘chazuke’ (rice served in a bowl of iced tea) is a deliciously refreshing summer meal,” says Arashiyama in his essay entitled “Gohan-tsu”. (Rice connoisseur).

I couldn’t agree with him more. These days, too, there are developments that make me want to encourage rice more than ever.

Rising wheat prices around the world are slowly driving up the price of bread here in Japan.

To avoid any further increase, the government has decided to freeze the prices of imported wheat. The situation is worrying.

For Japan, however, rice is an option.

The sharp increase in the price of wheat is due to the war in Ukraine which is hampering exports. Given this, it is natural for anyone to be concerned about food safety in an emergency. For Japan, this cannot be discussed without rice in the equation.

Kazuhito Yamashita, a former agriculture ministry official and currently director of research at the Canon Institute for Global Studies, offers rice exports from Japan.

In his book Kokumin no Tame no Shoku to No no Jugyo (Food and Agriculture Lessons for the People of Japan), Yamashita recommends that the government change its rice production policy from controlled production to increased production and export of rice in times of peace.

If shipping were to be completely halted, he continued, rice destined for export would have to be consumed domestically. And since this arrangement differs from storage, it costs nothing, he argues.

This plan may have various issues that need to be addressed, but I think it is worth looking into.

As for the situation of this year’s rice harvest, most regions would report similar levels to last year. Grateful for this good news, I look forward to the arrival of the new rice.

–The Asahi Shimbun, September 14

* * *

Vox Populi, Vox Dei is a popular daily column that covers a wide range of topics, including culture, the arts, and social trends and developments. Written by veteran writers from Asahi Shimbun, the column offers helpful perspectives and insights into contemporary Japan and its culture.

]]>
Japanese celebrity chef Nobu Matsuhisa visits Sydney’s Nobu restaurant for the first time https://nsms10.com/japanese-celebrity-chef-nobu-matsuhisa-visits-sydneys-nobu-restaurant-for-the-first-time/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 04:52:30 +0000 https://nsms10.com/japanese-celebrity-chef-nobu-matsuhisa-visits-sydneys-nobu-restaurant-for-the-first-time/ It’s hard to name a more famous and globally recognized Japanese restaurant brand than Nobu. Now the name behind it, chef Nobu Matsuhisa, is visiting his Sydney restaurant for the first time, and he’ll be hosting a cocktail party. The event will take place this Friday and will feature a number of Nobu’s signature dishes, […]]]>

It’s hard to name a more famous and globally recognized Japanese restaurant brand than Nobu. Now the name behind it, chef Nobu Matsuhisa, is visiting his Sydney restaurant for the first time, and he’ll be hosting a cocktail party.

The event will take place this Friday and will feature a number of Nobu’s signature dishes, with food stations including a sushi and sashimi bar, canapes and drinks. Guests will have the chance to meet Matsuhisa, who will be signing copies of her cookbook. Tickets also cover drinks, including cocktails, sake, and champagne.

Best known for marrying Peruvian flavors with Japanese cuisine, Nobu has grown into a global powerhouse, with more than 59 restaurants around the world. The original Nobu location in Tribeca, New York established itself as a hangout for Manhattan’s wealthy and glamorous. It is owned by Matsuhisa alongside Hollywood superstar Robert De Niro, film producer Meir Teper (From dusk till dawn, What eats Gilbert Raisin) and Crown Resorts.

Sydney’s Nobu opened in 2020 on level two of the Crown Towers, the third Nobu in Australia following openings in Melbourne and Perth. Chef Nobu will also host events at these restaurants. We’re told he will also use the time to work closely with Nobu’s head chefs – including Harold Hurtada in Sydney – as well as other Nobu employees.

The Nobu Sydney Cocktail takes place on Friday, September 16, and tickets are $400. You can book online.

]]>
The Parisian guide of designer Alexandra Golovanoff https://nsms10.com/the-parisian-guide-of-designer-alexandra-golovanoff/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 12:00:16 +0000 https://nsms10.com/the-parisian-guide-of-designer-alexandra-golovanoff/ I was born in Paris, but my family lived between there and Moscow in my early childhood. I remember that the buildings and avenues of Moscow seemed very big, so I always preferred the size of Paris. We finally settled in the 16th arrondissement on the right bank. It’s very chic, very green. We used […]]]>

I was born in Paris, but my family lived between there and Moscow in my early childhood. I remember that the buildings and avenues of Moscow seemed very big, so I always preferred the size of Paris. We finally settled in the 16th arrondissement on the right bank. It’s very chic, very green. We used to play in the Ranelagh Gardens, where there is a carousel with wooden horses and lots of trees to climb. There are small gardens all over Paris but my favorite is the Jardin Catherine-Labouré, behind the Bon Marché in the 7th arrondissement.

Golovanoff au Voltaire on the Quai Voltaire © Arnau Bach

I have spent my adult life so far on the left bank, in the 6th and 7th arrondissements. I have toured Place Saint-Sulpice in St-Germain-des-Prés – rue Bonaparte, rue du Four, rue Madame – so I have in-depth knowledge of a micro-district. Because it is full of shops, restaurants, bookstores and galleries, there are a lot of tourists but, contrary to what people think, it is a village full of locals where people know each other and say to each other hello. If friends are passing through, I recommend that they stay at the Hotel Duc de Saint-Simon, a small charming hotel in this area with a pretty courtyard and garden.

Golovanoff at Le Voltaire

Golovanoff at Voltaire © Arnau Bach

Hotel Duc de Saint-Simon

Hotel Duc de Saint-Simon

Today, I live on the banks of the Seine, in the antiques district – there are blocks of galleries along the rue de la Seine and the rue des Saints-Pères. My parents were antique dealers and I came here often when I was younger. I’ve loved shopping for antiques all my life and I’m always on the hunt for something. There is also the famous Paul Bert Serpette market in Saint-Ouen to the north of the town – recently I found a Willy Rizzo love lamp there, matching one I found 10 years ago, and I was just waiting to find a second one. But there are flea markets all over Paris on weekends, and I like to take advantage of them to go for a walk in different neighborhoods.

Most of the time I work from home and go out for my appointments or to shoot for my fashion brand. I usually take my bike. If I have a date, I like to go to Café Noir on rue de Luynes in the 7th arrondissement, where they roast their own coffee.

Doursoux military surplus store in the 15th arrondissement
Doursoux military surplus store in the 15th arrondissement

There are so many new places to eat, but I’m sticking to my old habits. I regularly eat soba noodles – hot in winter and cold in summer – at Yen, a Japanese restaurant on rue Saint-Benoît. I’m a regular at Café de Flore, and even though it’s touristy, it’s still very Parisian – even though we locals like to sit inside, not on the terrace. They’ve had the same staff for 25 years and they all greet me by name. I also like Le Voltaire for this reason. Thierry, one of the waiters, always shouts “Bonsoir, darling! The cuisine is simple and French. I never eat fries, except at Voltaire! And I love the ambiance of Café Basile on rue St-Guillaume, which has an original mid-century decor. It’s next to Sciences Po University so there are a lot of young people there. On weekends, we go to dinner and lunch with friends, very often at my place or theirs – I go shopping at the Alma-Marceau markets on Saturday mornings.

Café au Noir, in the 7th

Café au Noir, in the 7th

Julie de Libran's shop

Julie de Libran’s shop

For clothing shopping, the boutique of designer Julie de Libran, by appointment, is feminine without fuss. I love her jackets, coats and double cashmere knits. For shoes, Pierre Hardy’s shop is worth a visit. I choose at least two pairs every season because they give my outfits such personality, and even though I don’t wear a lot of sneakers, I love her white leather sneakers. Then for anything else, there is Doursoux in the 15th, a military surplus store where I have been going since I was a teenager. I love it for its khakis, pants and overalls – I love collecting styles from different eras and countries.

In my own cashmere designs, I draw inspiration from the colors of the city – the stone, the zinc roofs, the skies, all those muted shades. And then there’s the sunset when the Louvre turns pink, it’s magical. You can see it from the terrace of the Loulou restaurant at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, which is the best view in Paris, I think. Every time I leave and come back, I am struck by the beauty of this city; it changes and evolves but does not age.

]]>