Japan drink – NSMS 10 http://nsms10.com/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 10:33:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://nsms10.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-71-150x150.png Japan drink – NSMS 10 http://nsms10.com/ 32 32 Whiskey review: Suntory Whiskey Toki https://nsms10.com/whiskey-review-suntory-whiskey-toki/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 23:08:33 +0000 https://nsms10.com/whiskey-review-suntory-whiskey-toki/ Editor’s Note: This whiskey was provided to us as a review sample by Beam-Suntory. This in no case, by our editorial policies, influenced the final result of this review. It’s also worth noting that by clicking the purchase link near the bottom of this review, our site receives a small referral payment that helps support, […]]]>

Editor’s Note: This whiskey was provided to us as a review sample by Beam-Suntory. This in no case, by our editorial policies, influenced the final result of this review. It’s also worth noting that by clicking the purchase link near the bottom of this review, our site receives a small referral payment that helps support, but not influence, our editorial and other costs.

Have you ever watched old Suntory commercials? Otherwise, I suggest you start with this one from Sammie Davis Jr. These wild, spontaneous and musical advertisements are a thing of the past. And while Suntory has taken a very different direction with their marketing, like the ad for Suntory Whiskey Toki here, they continue to make quality blends to keep the quantity available. Even beyond just making blends, they make their blends for specific regions. If you look at the web page for Toki you will notice that it is not available in much of Asia. This is because Toki was designed for the foreign palate, as they make Suntory whiskey (often referred to as Kakubin, literally translated as square bottle) for the Japanese palate.

Japanese whiskey really took center stage in 2010 when 21-year-old Hibiki and 21-year-old Taketsuru took the top spots at the World Whiskeys Awards respectively for the Best Blended Whiskey in the World and the Best Blended Malt Whiskey in the World. This was followed by several years by a Japanese whiskey which won the award for the best single malt whiskey in the world, something that had only been held by Scotch until 2012. These award streaks resulted in a sharp increase in demand for Japanese whiskey and hence a shortage. of product. While the blend has always played a vital role in whiskey across the globe, it was the tool that would allow brands like Suntory and Nikka to maintain production as demand soared, sadly dropping many. products with age declarations for their ranges.

Suntory Whiskey Toki is a blend of two single malts (Yamazaki and Hakushu) and one single grain (Chita). It was first launched in 2016 exclusively in the US market. It is important to realize the extent of Suntory’s dedication to the art of blending. Even their single malt whiskeys are blended from a multitude of different distillates, with the resulting production of over 100 grain and malt whiskeys, all from just three distilleries. This great variety of whiskey turns into a total of five brands; Suntory, Hibiki, Yamazaki, Hakushu and Chita.

The extent of their dedication to the blend never struck me before visiting the Yamazaki Distillery and seeing their whiskey library, pictures halfway here. Each of these bottles documents a different barrel, with notes on the wort bill, size and shape of the still, type of barrel, and age. They document everything and work to create a library that their mixers can draw from as well as a historical archive to reference. While many blenders in Scotland had the opportunity to go to another distillery for the product, Japan was initially isolated. If they wanted the flavors they needed for the blend, they had to make them themselves.

So, as we see many age statements disappearing from Japanese whiskey bottles, we see products like Toki ramp up to meet the demand for these masterfully crafted products. And while Toki may not live up to the experience of sipping a finished Yamazaki in sherry casks or a 21-year-old Nikka, he serves his purpose of bringing the Japanese distillate to masses around the world.

Suntory Toki (image via Beam-Suntory)

Tasting Notes: Suntory Toki

Vital Statistics: blend of single malts from Yamazaki and Hakushu distilleries and single grain from Chita distillery, 43% ABV, around $ 30 per bottle

Appearance: This is a light straw color. The whiskey forms large balls which are spread out on top of each other around the glass.

Nose: Lemon oil and grain are apparent on the nose. The honeysuckle and caramel have a secondary note that gives depth to the smell of it.

Palace: I get a lot of sweet malt throughout the flavor profile. It has a brilliant lemony quality. There are lighter notes of honey and golden raisins. It evolves well and leaves a subtle crunchy finish. Adding water really brings out the richness of the grain. The finish remains fresh and crunchy. I find that the flavor profile is enhanced with a light mineral water like Topo Chico when making a highball.

Takeaway meals

Summary

While that makes it a perfectly fine sipper, I tend to look for something with a bit more depth when drinking it pure. It does remarkably well for cocktails and is my favorite highball. One part Toki for two parts sparkling water (or light mineral water) with a lemon zest is my favorite drink all year round. Although I occasionally try another whiskey in place of the Toki, I keep coming back for my highballs.


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Pablo Cheese Tart Japanese Cheesecake Opening in Vancouver https://nsms10.com/pablo-cheese-tart-japanese-cheesecake-opening-in-vancouver/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 01:27:12 +0000 https://nsms10.com/pablo-cheese-tart-japanese-cheesecake-opening-in-vancouver/ More cheese, cream and cream delicacies from Japan are heading to Vancouver soon 🍰 The “cheesecake war” has been going on for years in Japan and Pablo, the brand of “cheese pie” named in honor of artist Pablo Picasso, is one of the main contenders for the best of creamy, pastry cream and cheese in […]]]>

More cheese, cream and cream delicacies from Japan are heading to Vancouver soon 🍰

The “cheesecake war” has been going on for years in Japan and Pablo, the brand of “cheese pie” named in honor of artist Pablo Picasso, is one of the main contenders for the best of creamy, pastry cream and cheese in a puff pastry shell. .

Pablo Cheese Tart has been operating franchises in Canada for a few years now, but has yet to break into the British Columbia market – that is, until this year when Vancouver’s first location is expected to open this been near the town hall at 511 West Broadway.

The Japanese cheesecake company made the announcement on Jan. 4 with a social media post revealing details of their Vancouver location:

According to cooking enthusiasts, Pablo’s cheesecakes have garnered a “cult following” in Japan since their launch a decade ago and have led Osaka to become the place to go in the country for the best cheesecake.

Pablo calls their creation a “cheese pie” and offers them in full or mini format, as well as in specialty flavors, including some distinct options from the region; in Canada, although in Toronto, Edmonton and Calgary, Pablo offers a classic cheese pie with apricot frosting, as well as matcha, chocolate or “premium” (with a topping of burnt sugar).

Much like another big player in the Japanese cheesecake scene, Uncle Tetsu, Pablo also stamps their designs with their logo.

Uncle Tetsu is one of the most recognizable Japanese cheesecake brands currently operating in Vancouver, although you can also tag the specialty item in places like Bake 49, Castella, and Kekko.

Pablo Cheese Tart also has other menu items at their Canadian cafes, such as smoothies and other drinks, Japanese breads and baked goods, and creations that showcase their cheesecake topping, such as “cups.” cheese ”with fruit or other sweet toppings.

Follow @pablocheeseartbc for more information on Pablo’s arrival in British Columbia



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Wine giant turns to high-tech sensory enhancements to boost retail purchases https://nsms10.com/wine-giant-turns-to-high-tech-sensory-enhancements-to-boost-retail-purchases/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 11:41:52 +0000 https://nsms10.com/wine-giant-turns-to-high-tech-sensory-enhancements-to-boost-retail-purchases/ With sampling and tasting almost obsolete in stores after the COVID-19 pandemic hit the region, products that depend on sensory experiences to attract consumers, like wine, have had to find whole new ways. to attract consumers. According to Penfolds, one of the largest wine companies in the world, research has shown that 40% of the […]]]>

With sampling and tasting almost obsolete in stores after the COVID-19 pandemic hit the region, products that depend on sensory experiences to attract consumers, like wine, have had to find whole new ways. to attract consumers.

According to Penfolds, one of the largest wine companies in the world, research has shown that 40% of the two in five buyers who plan to buy wine eventually leave stores without a bottle, and a study of wine buyers in FairPrice and Cold Storage Singapore also showed that while an average buyer can spend four minutes browsing wine racks, some 32% of buyers found missing information on wines and flavor profiles.

This has led the company to believe that consumers feel a lack or lacuna in their wine shopping experience, thereby working to innovate what it calls “phygital” in-store displays to enhance that shopping experience.

“By introducing this brand new phygital mode of retail marketing and display, we hope to revitalize the experience of buyers by directly addressing their concerns and needs.”The Managing Director of Penfolds International (Southeast Asia, Japan, Korea, Europe, Middle East and Africa) said Yodissen Mootoosamy.

The “Penfolds” phygital displays [allow] for consumers to access information through digital technology, without losing the element of physical contact with the product they intend to buy – a combination that will help buyers feel at ease and sure of their final selection.


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World’s oldest person in Japan celebrates 119th birthday https://nsms10.com/worlds-oldest-person-in-japan-celebrates-119th-birthday/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 09:35:54 +0000 https://nsms10.com/worlds-oldest-person-in-japan-celebrates-119th-birthday/ The world’s oldest person, Kane Tanaka, born a year before the start of the Russo-Japanese War, celebrated his 119th birthday in southwestern Japan on Sunday. Tanaka, born Jan. 2, 1903 in Fukuoka Prefecture, lived through Japan’s current Meiji, Taisho, Showa, Heisei, and Reiwa eras, and hopes to live to be 120 as an immediate goal, […]]]>

The world’s oldest person, Kane Tanaka, born a year before the start of the Russo-Japanese War, celebrated his 119th birthday in southwestern Japan on Sunday.

Tanaka, born Jan. 2, 1903 in Fukuoka Prefecture, lived through Japan’s current Meiji, Taisho, Showa, Heisei, and Reiwa eras, and hopes to live to be 120 as an immediate goal, according to his family members. Personalities born in 1903 include British novelist George Orwell, director Yasujiro Ozu, and Japanese poet Misuzu Kaneko.

Kane Tanaka, the oldest person in the world, makes a peace sign in September 2021. (Photo courtesy of Fukuoka Prefecture) (Kyodo)

Tanaka was recognized by Guinness World Records in March 2019 as the oldest person in the world at 116 and also reached an all-time Japanese age record when she reached the age of 117 and 261 days.

Residing in a nursing home in Fukuoka, Tanaka interacts with staff through gestures and often challenges himself to solve digital puzzles. She loves chocolate and soft drinks.

When the centenary received flowers on Respect for the Elderly Day last September by Fukuoka Governor Seitaro Hattori, she expressed her joy by making a peace sign.

Tanaka, the seventh of nine siblings, got married at the age of 19. She supported her family by running a noodle shop when her husband and eldest son went to fight during the Second Sino-Japanese War which began in 1937.

“I would like to personally congratulate her soon,” Tanaka’s grandson Eiji, 62, said. “I hope she stays healthy and has fun every day as she gets older.”


Associated coverage:

Japan’s centenarians hit record 86,500 – over 10,000 for the first time

World’s oldest person in southwestern Japan turns 118



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Omicron’s New Year’s cocktail: sadness, fear but hope for 2022 https://nsms10.com/omicrons-new-years-cocktail-sadness-fear-but-hope-for-2022/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:45:00 +0000 https://nsms10.com/omicrons-new-years-cocktail-sadness-fear-but-hope-for-2022/ PARIS (AP) – Grief for the dead and dying, fear of new infections to come and hopes of ending the coronavirus pandemic were – once again – the bittersweet cocktail the world has says good riddance until 2021 and ushered in 2022. New Years Eve, which was once celebrated around the world with a wild […]]]>

PARIS (AP) – Grief for the dead and dying, fear of new infections to come and hopes of ending the coronavirus pandemic were – once again – the bittersweet cocktail the world has says good riddance until 2021 and ushered in 2022.

New Years Eve, which was once celebrated around the world with a wild and free spirit, felt more like a deja vu, with the fast-spreading omicron variant filling hospitals again.

At La Timone hospital in Marseille, in the south of France, Dr Fouad Bouzana could only sigh on Friday when asked what 2022 could bring.

“Big question,” he said. “It’s starting to get exhausting, as the waves follow one another.

The 2021 game-changing pandemic – vaccinations – continued at a steady pace, with some people receiving injections while others stocked up on drinks and treats for a moderate feast. Some milestones have been taken: Pakistan said it had fully immunized 70 million of its 220 million people this year and Britain said it had met its goal of offering a booster shot to all adults by Friday .

In Russia, President Vladimir Poutine mourned the dead, praised the Russians for their strength in difficult times and soberly warned that the pandemic “is not receding yet”. Russia’s virus task force has reported 308,860 deaths from COVID-19, but its national statistics agency says the death toll has been more than double.

“I would like to express words of sincere support to all those who have lost loved ones,” Putin said in a televised speech broadcast just before midnight in each of Russia’s 11 time zones.

Elsewhere, the place many chose for New Year’s celebrations was the same place they became too familiar with during shutdowns: their homes. Due to omicron’s virulence, cities have canceled traditional New Year’s concerts and fireworks to avoid attracting large crowds.

Pope Francis has also canceled his New Year’s Eve tradition of visiting the full-size nativity scene in St. Peter’s Square, again to avoid a crowd. In an unusual gesture for Francis, the 85-year-old pontiff donned a surgical mask for a Vespers prayer and hymn service on Friday night as he sat in an armchair. But he also gave a standing and unmasked homily.

“A sense of being lost has grown around the world during the pandemic,” Francis told worshipers at St. Peter’s Basilica.

Face masks became mandatory again on the streets of Paris on Friday, a rule largely ignored among the afternoon crowds that thronged the sun-drenched Champs-Elysees, where a scheduled fireworks display was canceled. With nearly 50% of intensive care beds in Ile-de-France occupied by COVID-19 patients, hospitals have been ordered to postpone non-essential surgeries.

France, Britain, Portugal and Australia were among the countries that set new records for COVID-19 infections as 2021 gave way to 2022.

France’s unprecedented 232,200 new cases on Friday marked its third consecutive day above the 200,000 mark. The UK followed closely behind, with 189,846 new cases, also a record. In London, officials said up to 1 in 15 people had been infected with the virus in the week leading up to Christmas. Hospitalizations of COVID-19 patients in the UK have increased 68% over the past week, to the highest levels since February.

Yet loud New Year’s celebrations kicked off in the Serbian capital of Belgrade where, unlike elsewhere in Europe, mass gatherings were allowed despite fears of the omicron variant. Large crowds gathered on Friday night for outdoor concerts, fireworks and a light show, and hotels and bars were packed. A medical expert has predicted that Serbia will experience thousands of new COVID-19 infections after the holidays.

More than 300,000 visitors were expected in Las Vegas for events including a New Year’s Eve fireworks display on the Strip that was canceled last year due to the pandemic.

Australia continued to celebrate despite reporting a record 32,000 new cases. Thousands of fireworks lit the sky over the Harbor Bridge and the Sydney Opera House at midnight. Yet in the midst of the virus wave, crowds were much smaller than in the pre-pandemic years.

Neighboring New Zealand has taken a more low-key approach, replacing its fireworks show in Auckland with a show of lights projected on landmarks such as the Sky Tower and Harbor Bridge.

In Japan, writer Naoki Matsuzawa said he would spend the next few days cooking and delivering food to the elderly as some stores would be closed. He said the vaccinations had made people less anxious about the pandemic, despite the new variant.

“Numbness has set in and we’re not too scared anymore,” said Matsuzawa, who lives in Yokohama, southwest of Tokyo. “Some of us are starting to take it for granted that this won’t happen to me.”

People thronged to temples and shrines, most of them wearing masks. Some ignored the virus, dining and drinking in downtown Tokyo and flocking to stores, celebrating their release from recent virus restrictions.

In Seoul, the capital of South Korea, the annual New Year’s Eve ringing ceremony was canceled for the second year in a row due to an increase in the number of cases, and a pre-recorded video was released online and on the television.

South Korean authorities have also shut down many beaches and other tourist attractions along the east coast, which are usually teeming with people hoping to witness the first sunrise of the year, and have extended the strict distancing rules by two weeks. additional.

In India, millions of people rang the bell at the start of the year from their homes, with nighttime curfews and other restrictions making celebrations in New Delhi, Mumbai and other major cities. Authorities have imposed restrictions to keep revelers away from restaurants, hotels, beaches and bars amid an increase in omicron-fueled cases.

Many Indonesians have also given up their usual festivities for a quieter evening at home, after the government banned many New Year’s celebrations.

In Hong Kong, a New Years concert featuring local celebrities including boy group Mirror was the first big New Years event since 2018, after events were canceled in 2019 due to political disputes and last year because of the pandemic.

In mainland China, the Shanghai government has canceled an annual light show along the Huangpu River that typically draws hundreds of thousands of spectators. There was no plan for public festivities in Beijing, where popular temples have been closed or have limited access since mid-December.

Popular temples in eastern Chinese cities Nanjing, Hangzhou and other major cities have canceled the traditional New Year’s “luck ringing” ceremonies and asked the public to stay away.

In the Philippines, a powerful typhoon two weeks ago wiped out the basic necessities of tens of thousands before New Year’s Eve. More than 400 people were killed by Typhoon Rai and at least 82 are still missing.

Leahmer Singson, a 17-year-old mother, lost her home in a fire last month, then the typhoon swept away her temporary log cabin in Cebu City. She will welcome the New Year with her husband, who works in a glass and aluminum factory, and her 1-year-old baby in a dilapidated tent in a clearing where hundreds of other families have erected small tents from debris , sacks of rice and tarpaulins.

When asked what she wanted for the New Year, Singson made a simple wish: “Hope we don’t get sick.”

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Perry reported from Wellington, New Zealand.

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Associated Press reporters Daniel Cole in Marseille; Vladimir Isachenkov in Moscow; Frances D’Emilio in Rome; Sylvia Hui in London; Darko Vojinovic in Belgrade, Serbia; Yuri Kageyama in Tokyo; Hyung-jin Kim in Seoul, South Korea; Ashok Sharma in New Delhi; Niniek Karmini and Edna Tarigan in Jakarta, Indonesia; Hau Dinh in Hanoi, Vietnam; Zen Soo in Hong Kong; Tassanee Vejpongsa in Bangkok; Jim Gomez in Manila, Philippines; and AP researcher Chen Si in Shanghai contributed to this report.


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Year in review: the best gastronomic news of 2021 https://nsms10.com/year-in-review-the-best-gastronomic-news-of-2021/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 06:04:06 +0000 https://nsms10.com/year-in-review-the-best-gastronomic-news-of-2021/ Entertaining | 1 hour ago Year in review: Entertainment director Melina Keays picks the 10 best food and drink articles of 2021 Wallpaper’s Melina Keays reveals her 10 best food and drink stories of 2021, from John Pawson’s cookbook to the world’s oldest Japanese whiskey Dive into the top food and drink articles of 2021 […]]]>

Entertaining
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1 hour ago

Year in review: Entertainment director Melina Keays picks the 10 best food and drink articles of 2021

Wallpaper’s Melina Keays reveals her 10 best food and drink stories of 2021, from John Pawson’s cookbook to the world’s oldest Japanese whiskey

Dive into the top food and drink articles of 2021 chosen by Wallpaper * Entertainment Director Melina Keays. The selection is a veritable feast of exceptional liquors, delicious dishes and breathtaking restaurants. Discover the craftsmanship behind Japan’s oldest whiskey, learn how to brew the perfect cup of coffee, sip fine wines surrounded by artwork by Louise Bourgeois and Jenny Holzer, step into John Pawson’s kitchen for dishes minimalists, and more. We hope you are hungry.

Top 10 Food and Drink Stories of the Year

01. Bread business: the South Korean bakery reinvents white bread

“White bread” might be synonymous with “boring,” but this story about a Korean white bread bakery has been one of the most popular entertaining stories this year, and it’s easy to see why. Whitelier is a new bakery chain that turns humble white bread into an epicurean delight. Visitors to its elegantly designed stores can feast on ultra-thick cloud-like pieces of white bread, coated in innovative spreads such as pink cherry blossom and spring mugwort paste, and tangy strawberry jelly. and rose.

02. Connaught’s art-filled red room serves the best wine in the world

The Connaught Bar in London is already considered by many to be the best place for a drink in the world, but the opening of its new Red Room goes one step further to prove what makes this place so special.

The new space focuses on wine, which is served from The Connaught’s collection of 3,000 labels and over 30,000 bottles. The bar’s revolutionary Coravin system (which allows wine to be poured without removing the cork) allows rare and exceptional wines to be served by the glass (including a 1994 Petrus, the most famous Merlot in the world).

This unprecedented wine selection is complemented by equally impressive interiors, with a collection of red-hued artwork by four visionary women: Louise Bourgeois, Jenny Holzer, Trina McKillen and pioneering young Vietnamese artist, Tia-Thuy. Nguyen.

READ MORE

03. Adventures in whiskey: an immersive experience in the reinvented Glenmorangie House

In the heart of Scotland’s rugged Highlands, the Glenmorangie Distillery and House offer an immersive whiskey experience like no other. Visitors can elevate their single malt adventures with a stay at Glenmorangie House, a magnificent 17th century property surrounded by barley fields and nestled in the beautiful local landscape.

The house is only minutes from the Glenmorangie Distillery, where a new extension has just opened called The Lighthouse. A research and innovation lab designed by architects Barthélémy Griño, The Lighthouse is a revolutionary multi-million pound addition to the distillery’s existing stone buildings, which promises to revolutionize the whiskey industry.

04. Aman Tokyo’s new pastry shop is a culinary destination

The Aman aesthetic of serene and gracious hospitality in a beautiful natural setting has been firmly entrenched in our consciousness since the first Aman retreat opened in Thailand in 1988.

In 2021, the legendary hotel opened its first stand-alone pastry shop and it is an equally impressive delight. The Tokyo-based boutique is a culinary theater where customers can watch highly skilled chefs bake sculptural French cakes and cookies.

05. The St Pancras Renaissance hotel opens the 1869 restaurant reservation desk

One of the most amazing restaurant openings of 2021 was The Booking Office 1869 at St Pancras Renaissance Hotel, London. Imagined by Harry Handelsman, founder of Chiltern Firehouse, The Booking Office is, as its name suggests, located in the old ticket office of St Pancras station.

The historic space has been redesigned by Franco-Mexican designer Hugo Toro with dazzling results. Majestic chandeliers light up the space, revealing cathedral-like ceilings flanked by palm trees and lavish cabins reminiscent of intimate nightclubs from Hollywood’s golden age.

It’s a welcome addition to the London scene, whether for a glamorous night out or an intimate encounter with loved ones, or potentially soon loved ones, in a city that has surely missed the possibilities of those parties.

READ MORE

06. Learn to cook like a minimalist with John Pawson

While cooking in a John Pawson kitchen may be a distant dream for most, the chance to cook like the architectural designer in his own kitchen has just become attainable. In 2021, Pawson and his wife Catherine released Home Farm Cooking, a cookbook filled with recipes the couple regularly cooks for family and friends.

Dishes include classic, hearty dishes like fish pie and saffron chicken tagine with dried fruit, and simpler, but no less delicious, recipes like roasted carrots with a creamy tahini vinaigrette.

07. It’s time to taste the oldest Japanese whiskey in the world

2021 saw Japan’s first whiskey distillery, The House of Suntory, release the world’s oldest Japanese whiskey – Yamazaki 55. The whiskey is, as the name suggests, 55 years old and it is the perfect distillation of this. which distinguishes Japanese whiskey from others: finesse, balance and complexity.

In this article, we visit The House of Suntory Distillery to learn more about how this very special drink is made.

08. Tequila Reputation Makeover is Driven by Design

Gone are the days when a tequila order meant the night was about to take another turn (potentially debauchery). In this article, we discover a new generation of tequila and mezcal brands investing in stylish packaging and quality agave to transform the liqueurs reputation from the drink of the decadent to the drink of the debonair.

Savor what they have to offer here.

09. Is this coffee machine the key to a perfect brew?

The Morning Machine is a new coffee maker from Singapore that turns your morning brew into a high-tech science. Designed by two pioneers of the Asian specialty coffee movement – Leon Foo, founder of PPP Coffee in Singapore, and Andre Chanco, co-founder of Yardstick Coffee in the Philippines – the machine is equipped with so many features and built-in devices that you You will be wondering how you ever thought that coffee was as simple as granules and water.

This is a coffee lover’s dream come true, but know that it will make you drink so much caffeine that you may never dream of it again.

READ MORE

10. Super scoops: cool ice cream recipes

These elegantly made ice cream recipes are the perfect way to cap off a holiday celebration. From brioche bread ice cream to sweet mini cones, we share ideas that will suit all tastes.

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PFOS exceeds state set levels at 38 sites near U.S. bases https://nsms10.com/pfos-exceeds-state-set-levels-at-38-sites-near-u-s-bases/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 09:05:00 +0000 https://nsms10.com/pfos-exceeds-state-set-levels-at-38-sites-near-u-s-bases/ NAHA – Water quality checks near U.S. bases in Okinawa Prefecture found alarming levels of a suspected carcinogen and other substances at 38 locations, more than 70 percent of 49 locations surveyed . In all of these cases, the levels of toxic materials exceeded the criteria established by the government. In its guidelines on the […]]]>

NAHA – Water quality checks near U.S. bases in Okinawa Prefecture found alarming levels of a suspected carcinogen and other substances at 38 locations, more than 70 percent of 49 locations surveyed .

In all of these cases, the levels of toxic materials exceeded the criteria established by the government.

In its guidelines on the quality of drinking and river water, as well as groundwater, the Ministry of the Environment sets an interim objective to limit the combined presence of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and other substances to a maximum of 50 nanograms per liter of water.

On December 27, Okinawa Prefecture released the results of regular water quality checks around US bases that began in fiscal year 2017. Authorities collected samples there between August and October in places that are not used for drawing drinking water.

The results showed that the level of PFOS and other substances exceeded the ministry’s target at the 14 sites surveyed near the US Kadena Air Base, which straddles Okinawa, Kadena, Chatan and other municipalities in the prefecture. more to the south.

The level of PFOS and other substances also exceeded the target at 11 of the 20 sites surveyed around the United States Marine Corps Futenma Air Force Base in Ginowan. The base released water contaminated with PFOS into the city’s sewage system in August.

Over 1000 nanograms of PFOS and other substances per liter of water, 20 times more than the target, were detected at eight sites near the two US bases.

A water quality check on a sample taken from groundwater flowing under a private house in the town of Kadena found the level of PFOS and other substances to be 2,300 nanograms per liter, or 46 times more than the government level.

Japan, in principle, banned the manufacture and use of PFOS in 2010. The substance had been used in fire fighting foam.

The central and prefectural governments have asked the US military to allow them to conduct on-site inspections at its bases.

But those demands have fallen on deaf ears, leaving authorities unable to determine why PFOS and other substances were detected during local water quality checks.


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Here’s what some of Seattle’s chefs from different cultures eat to celebrate the New Year https://nsms10.com/heres-what-some-of-seattles-chefs-from-different-cultures-eat-to-celebrate-the-new-year/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://nsms10.com/heres-what-some-of-seattles-chefs-from-different-cultures-eat-to-celebrate-the-new-year/ On the first morning of every year, my mother cooks ozōni. This soup, consumed only on New Years Day in Japan, has regional variations. But our family’s version was simple: sliced ​​shiitake mushrooms, komatsuna leaves, abuurage (twice fried tofu) and grilled mochi floating in clear broth. Lightweight yet nutritious, it always felt like the perfect […]]]>

On the first morning of every year, my mother cooks ozōni. This soup, consumed only on New Years Day in Japan, has regional variations. But our family’s version was simple: sliced ​​shiitake mushrooms, komatsuna leaves, abuurage (twice fried tofu) and grilled mochi floating in clear broth.

Lightweight yet nutritious, it always felt like the perfect first meal of the year. As I got older, I found it also healing for the stomach ache from a night of drinking. No New Year’s Day is complete without it.

The New Year is an important celebration in many cultures – a time to reflect on a year that has gone well, celebrate, and plan goals for the next. Most cultures have their own versions of ozōni – dishes as important for the holidays as counting seconds until midnight or setting resolutions for the following year.

I asked six Seattle-area chefs from different cultures what they ate on New Years Day. They told me about New Years dishes ranging from devil’s eggs and black-eyed peas to tamales and Turkish tripe soup – and the rich cultural stories behind why they eat these things.

(Note: Many chefs in the Seattle area celebrate the Lunar New Year instead of the Gregorian calendar. But for the purposes of this story, we’ve chosen to focus on those celebrating the upcoming Gregorian New Year. )

Trey Lamont

Lamont is the chef and co-owner of Jerk Shack, a Belltown restaurant with Caribbean-inspired cuisine. jerkshackseattle.com

For Trey Lamont, New Years means beans: specifically, black-eyed peas and rice and peas – a Caribbean dish of rice and red beans cooked with coconut milk and spices like cumin, thyme and allspice.

Lamont’s lineage, from his father’s side, leads back to Senegal. This is where his ancestors lived before settling in the Caribbean, being enslaved there and ending up in the southern United States. He says most people in the West African Diaspora eat beans on New Years Day.

“The bean represents new life, doesn’t it? Because it’s a seed, and if you put it in the ground, it germinates and grows, ”says Lamont.

He has fond childhood memories of eating black-eyed peas, originally from West Africa, with his father and grandmother every New Year. Now Lamont serves black-eyed peas with chicken and andouille sausage on Jerk Shack’s New Years Eve menu (he serves rice and peas all year round).

At home on New Year’s Day, he carries on the tradition with his wife and children.

“It does me good to be able to pass something on to the next generation that they will remember for the rest of their lives,” he says.

Lamont also wants his children to stay connected to their West African heritage.

“There aren’t many cultural foods that African Americans (eat) that predate slavery,” he says. “These are things they couldn’t get rid of. ”

Shota nakajima

Nakajima owns Taku, a Capitol Hill restaurant that offers karaage and other Japanese snacks. He was a finalist in season 18 of “Top Chef”. takseattle.com

When Shota Nakajima trained under celebrity chef Yasuhiko Sakamoto in Osaka as a young chef, December was the toughest month of the year. The cooks at the Michelin-starred restaurant were busy making their osechi-ryōri (New Year’s food served in stackable boxes, like an elaborate bento) that sold for $ 1,000 each. The restaurant’s osechi was like a jewelry box, filled with over 100 multi-colored sweet and savory dishes, many of which were extremely painstaking. To make the candied chestnuts, for example, Nakajima had to gently brush each one with a toothbrush to remove the inner skin without breaking the fragile nut and ruining its appearance.

In Japan, you’re not supposed to work on New Years Day. So in the last days of December, chefs and home cooks make osechi – savory and sweet dishes that keep at room temperature – to snack on. at the beginning of the year.

When Nakajima returned to Seattle, he continued to do osechi. His family version has around 40 elements. Most of the dishes have special meanings, often using puns based on their names: kuromame (black beans in syrup) for hard work, tazukuri (candied dried anchovies) for a bountiful harvest, red and white kamaboko fish patties. (Red for ward ward off evil spirits, white for purity.)

On most New Years days, Nakajima drinks sake, eats osechi, and makes mochi in a variety of ways. He toasts the soft dough, brushes it with soy sauce and the crispy nori envelope; he sprinkles it with kinako (roasted soy flour) and the asparagus with black sugar syrup; he puts it in oshiruko (sweet red bean soup), and of course, in ozōni, which in his family, is made with chicken as well as vegetables.

Nakajima’s parents are out of town this year, so he doesn’t cook a full osechi, but without certain foods, New Years is just not New Years.

“There’s no way I won’t eat mochi on New Year’s Day,” says Nakajima.

Mwana Moyo

Mwana is the chef and owner of Moyo Kitchen, which serves dishes from Tanzania, Somalia and Kenya from his stall in Gastronomic Hall of the Spice Bridge in Tukwila. moyokitchen.square.site

Mwana Moyo would spend New Years Eve having a big picnic on the beach while growing up in Zanzibar, an archipelago and an autonomous region of Tasmania off the east coast of Africa.

There was usually a lot of fried fish and other seafood, like octopus, squid, and crab, and always a bunch of pilau – rice cooked with broth and some kind of meat, usually beef.

“Growing up, my mother and grandmother would cook (pilau) during the holidays,” says Mwana.

Earlier in the day, she was drinking chai and eating cookies and cakes with her family. And after a night out at the beach, she was watching fireworks.

Once Mwana moved to Seattle, the beach was a bit too cold and the sunset a bit too early for a New Years Eve beach date. But she still cooks the same foods for her. family.

Berk Güldal

Güldal is the chef behind Hamdi, one of the hottest summer pop-ups, which currently serves kebabs, kokoreç sandwiches and other Turkish fare at Fair Isle Brewing in Ballard every Sunday. instagram.com/hamdisettle

Growing up in Istanbul, Berk Güldal started New Years Eve with a big meal for his friends and family. The table was loaded with half a dozen mezzes like ksir (a bulgur salad) and çerkez tavugu (a chicken spread his family only made on holidays), a large salad, and a roast turkey.

The meal started around 7 p.m. and lasted for hours. He ate very slowly.

“Sometimes it even goes until New Years if the conversations are really good,” he says.

After dinner, he drank raki (grape alcohol made from anise) with friends until 4 or 5 a.m., when the festivities ended with a tripe soup that was supposed to relieve the hangover. the following day.

Since Güldal moved to the United States to work at Michelin-starred restaurants like Eleven Madison Park and the SingleThread Farm restaurant, he has spent most New Years Eve working in a kitchen.

Last year, however, he took a break from the pandemic and ate a dry duck with his partner, Katrina Schult. This year he will celebrate with another meal with Schult, accompanied by lots of raki, of course.

Stuart Street

Lane is the chef and co-owner of Spinasse, a gourmet restaurant in Capitol Hill focused on cuisine from the Italian Piedmont region. spinasse.com

Like Güldal, Stuart Lane has spent many New Years in a kitchen. He now finishes working with his collaborators at Spinasse every year.

While working at the Juanita Cafe in Kirkland, Stuart would start work at 9 a.m. on December 31 and go out after 2 a.m.

“Our busiest time of year is between Christmas and New Year’s Eve,” says Lane.

Besides being busy, preparing complex special dishes for the holidays, including many new dishes each year, is stressful.

So Lane is always exhausted on New Years Day. He says he celebrates by “doing as little as possible”.

But Lane still takes the time to make devilish eggs, which he eats every New Years growing up in Edmonds, a family tradition he continues with his 2-year-old daughter. Eggs, he says, represent a new beginning in Italy. (Lane’s mother is half Sicilian.)

At Spinasse this year, he offers a six-course meal rich in symbols. It’ll start, auspiciously, with a free lentil dish. (In Italy, lentils, which look like coins, are believed to attract wealth for the following year.) And one of the choices for the third course is red silk handkerchief pasta with braised guinea fowl. and white truffles. In Italy, wearing red underwear on New Year’s Eve brings good luck.

Even though New Years Eve is busy at upscale Italian restaurants, kitchen staff often find brief moments of celebration. When working in Italy, Lane remembers a chef who would stop cooking – while customers waited for dessert – so staff could toast glasses of prosecco to celebrate the end of the year.

Osbaldo Hernandez

Hernandez is one of the owners of Frelard Tamales, a takeaway tamale shop in the Lac Vert district. frelardtamales.com

Osbaldo Hernandez celebrates New Years Eve with a tamalada, a tamale-making party. Since he and her husband, Dennis Ramey, opened Frelard Tamales in 2018, most days of his life have felt like a tamalada.

But a New Year’s tamalada is special. When Hernandez was growing up in Jalisco, Mexico, a large group of family and friends gathered in the early morning of December 31 to start the party. Moms and grandmothers made the garnishes. The children mixed the masa. Then they would work together to put them together and wrap the tamales in corn husks while drinking ponche (hot, alcohol-free fruit punch infused with sugar and cinnamon.) Once the tamales were steamed, everything everyone ate them with pozole.

Tamales and pozole aren’t New Years specific dishes per se, but they are both popular holiday foods in the winter.

“Mexicans call the winter season the tamales,” Hernandez says. Pozole has been a festive dish in Mexico since the days of the Aztecs, for whom corn was a sacred plant.

Hernandez is hosting the New Year’s Eve tamalada this year. He will be bringing back tamales from his restaurant. But when Frelard Tamales closes at 2 p.m. on New Years Eve and the main cooks (his parents) come home, they show up to reheat the steaming ponche and pozole on the stove.



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Photos of what Christmas looks like around the world https://nsms10.com/photos-of-what-christmas-looks-like-around-the-world/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 02:15:00 +0000 https://nsms10.com/photos-of-what-christmas-looks-like-around-the-world/ Glitter pines, Santa Claus, and stockings are some of the Christmas ideas of many people, but the holidays can be very different around the world. From Europe to Asia to the depths of Antarctica, here’s how Christmas is celebrated in nine places around the world – and one place. in orbit around the world. Croatia […]]]>

Glitter pines, Santa Claus, and stockings are some of the Christmas ideas of many people, but the holidays can be very different around the world.

From Europe to Asia to the depths of Antarctica, here’s how Christmas is celebrated in nine places around the world – and one place. in orbit around the world.

Croatia

Christmas celebrations in Croatia start early, with some traditions starting in November.

Like other Europeans, Croats also celebrate St. Nicholas’ Day in early December, during which children put their shoes on, expecting St. Nick to leave them with candy and small gifts, according to the website. St. Nicholas Center Christmas Resource.

In some parts of Europe, children think that Saint Nicholas leaves chocolates and gifts in their shoes if they have behaved well. Otherwise, Krampus, a monster-like creature, may leave charcoal or dried twigs.

Monika Skolimowska | image alliance | Getty Images

“As a child, I used to leave a shoe on the window,” said Antonio Zdunich, who was born in Croatia. “Someone was filling it with gifts and candy during the night, and I would wake up and be all happy”

Many Croatian families are planting wheat on December 13 with the belief that if it grows well the next year will be prosperous for them, he said.

Sweden

Swedes decorate Christmas trees and exchange gifts, just like in other parts of the world, Swede Patrik Kerttu said.

The Disney special titled “From all of us to you all” is regularly the most-watched Swedish television show of the year, competing only with the country’s selections for the Eurovision Song Contest.

LMPC | Getty Images

They also celebrate with Donald Duck. Last year, more than 4.5 million people, almost half of Sweden’s population, watched the 1958 Disney special “From all of us to all”, according to the English-speaking European news network, The Local. The show has aired there every year since 1959.

Popular foods this time of year are meatballs, ham, smoked or pickled salmon, pickled herring and a potato-anchovy casserole called Jansson’s Temptation, Kerttu said.

India

While some parts of the country celebrate in different ways, Christian families in India typically combine Western traditions with customs unique to India.

Mayur Kakade | instant | Getty Images

“Christmas is quite an important holiday for my family as it is the one time in the year that most of the family get together,” said Isha Meleth, who is Christian and originally from the state of Kerala, in southern India. “We are building a Christmas crib [nativity scene] in front of the house … on Christmas Eve. “

Two popular Christmas dishes are kheer, a type of sweet milk pudding, and kallappam, a coconut-rice pancake that’s more common in southern India, Meleth said.

Japan

For most Japanese, Christmas is a secular affair rather than a religious one.

Many Japanese celebrate the holiday much like Valentine’s Day, with couples spending the day together, according to JR Pass, a Japanese train travel company. It is common for people to go to dinner parties and walk around looking at Christmas lights with their partners.

One of the most discussed traditions – at least outside of Japan – is the culture’s fascination with having fried chicken for Christmas, often from American fast food chain KFC.

One theory behind the Japanese custom of eating KFC at Christmas is that it was a foreigner’s food of choice for the holidays since turkey was not available. This inspired the company to market it as a Christmas food, a representative from KFC Japan told CNBC.

Yuichi Yamazaki | Getty Images

A 1974 holiday marketing campaign called “Kentucky Christmas” kicked off a practice that is now celebrated by millions of Japanese people, said Tatsuya Noguchi, a representative for KFC Japan.

According to Noguchi, pre-orders for meals like the “Party Barrel” or the “Christmas Pack” begin about seven weeks in advance. The restaurant chain also recorded its highest sales of the year between December 23 and 25, he said.

“The busiest day each year is December 24, which is about five to 10 times as busy as the annual average,” Noguchi said.

Philippines

About 92% of the 110 million people of the Philippines are Christians. Christmas is the most important time of the year in the Philippines, and the country is said to celebrate the holiday longer than anywhere else, from September to January.

“Like many Latin cultures, my family in the Philippines celebrates Nochebuena, which is a big party on Christmas Eve,” said Siena Klinzing, who is half Filipino. “It involves getting together as a family, having a big feast and sharing gifts.”

For many Filipino families, Christmas is incomplete without lechon, a whole roast pig with crispy skin.

Noël Celis | AFP | Getty Images

She said her family would stay up, much like New Years Eve, to wish everyone a “Merry Christmas” as soon as the clock strikes midnight, she added.

Another important tradition is Simbang Gabi, which means “mass at night,” where people wake up before dawn to attend mass for nine days from December 16 to 24. It is believed that those who complete the nine days can ask for a blessing, Klinzing says.

United Arab Emirates

Although the official religion of the UAE is Islam, Christmas is celebrated in some parts of the country.

This is a particularly important case in the emirates of Abu Dhabi and Dubai, where a large number of expatriates reside.

Dubai hosts large, ornately decorated Christmas tree lighting ceremonies, like this one at Al-Wasl Dome at the heart of Expo 2020 Dubai.

AFP | Getty Images

Shopping malls and hotels are often heavily decorated with Christmas trees that span multiple floors, according to Visit Dubai, the emirate’s official tourist site.

Christmas markets, shows and special holiday menus at restaurants are also common in December.

Mexico

Christmas in Mexico is marked by large parades with floats and colorful costumes, candy-filled pinatas and nativity scenes. But one of the country’s most popular customs is Las Posadas, a celebration during the nine days leading up to Christmas.

Costumed dancers take part in a traditional Christmas and New Years parade in Chilpancingo, a town in the Mexican state of Guerrero.

Pedro Pardo | AFP | Getty Images

“Every night people form a procession of songs meant to represent Mary and Joseph’s journey to Bethlehem,” said Mexican food blogger Mely Martinez.

These processions usually culminate at someone’s house, where everyone gathers for a party with dishes such as tamales, Christmas punch and candy, she said. Other popular Christmas foods include pozole, sweet fried dough donuts called bunuelos, and a hot chocolate drink called champurrado, Martinez said.

Kenya

Christmas is a time of migration for many in Kenya. Cities, including the capital Nairobi, experience an exodus in December as masses of people flock to their hometowns and villages to reunite with their families.

Believers of Legio Maria, a religious movement born among the Luo people of western Kenya, attend an overnight Christmas mass near Ugunja, Kenya on December 25, 2017.

Fredrik Lerneryd | AFP | Getty Images

Most churches hold a night vigil on Christmas Eve, where people sing Christmas carols and hymns for hours, said Shikriti Mandal, who grew up in Kenya.

On Christmas Day, families and friends host a feast that often includes barbecued goat or lamb meat called nyama choma, Mandal said.

Antarctic

Currently, the South Pole is home to 70 permanent research stations representing 29 different countries, according to Oceanwide Expeditions, a travel agency in the Arctic and Antarctic.

Since the usual Christmas hustle and bustle is absent, stations are finding creative ways to celebrate with colleagues.

A man dressed as Santa Claus is on his way to visit the Seabourn Quest cruise ship on Christmas morning at Cuverville Island in the Antarctic Peninsula region.

Wolfgang Kaehler | LightRocket | Getty Images

“Each of our five Antarctic research stations celebrates Christmas in its own way, depending on the weather,” said Kathleen Maclean, representative of the British Antarctic Survey. Some can roast a turkey and eat canned and frozen vegetables, while others sing Christmas carols, watch Christmas movies and play board games, she said.

Despite the festivities, research continues because “long-term surveillance data has yet to be collected,” Maclean said.

International space station

Such is the spirit of Christmas that humans have found a way to celebrate it 227 nautical miles (420 kilometers) above Earth.

According to the NASA website, astronauts aboard the International Space Center have celebrated Christmas, Hanukkah and the New Year for the past 21 years and have developed a few traditions along the way.

Celebrations aboard the ISS include decorating the station, tasting plastic-bagged versions of traditional foods like turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes and cookies, and filming videos of holiday greetings that are sent back to earth.

Christmas also comes twice on the Space Station as it falls on January 7 on the Russian Orthodox calendar, which many Russian astronauts follow.


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Drink milk, Japan urges people as huge waste looms, Trending News https://nsms10.com/drink-milk-japan-urges-people-as-huge-waste-looms-trending-news/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 14:32:29 +0000 https://nsms10.com/drink-milk-japan-urges-people-as-huge-waste-looms-trending-news/ Japan can get a global picture of a high tech country where extremely disciplined citizens walk the roads just like Yakuza, the dreaded Japanese mafia! But the country is in the news for an interesting reason. Milk! Japanese politicians urge people to drink milk. Ministers drink glasses of milk at press conferences to get the […]]]>

Japan can get a global picture of a high tech country where extremely disciplined citizens walk the roads just like Yakuza, the dreaded Japanese mafia! But the country is in the news for an interesting reason. Milk!

Japanese politicians urge people to drink milk. Ministers drink glasses of milk at press conferences to get the point across. A big brand hired a celebrity to encourage the consumption of milk and even the prime minister joined the chorus urging the Japanese to take a nourishing sip.

“We would like the people to cooperate by drinking one more cup of milk than usual and using dairy products for cooking,” Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said on Tuesday. He was speaking at a press conference held at the end of the parliamentary session.

Kishida is not alone in this milk crusade. On December 17, Japanese Agriculture Minister Genjiro Kaneko and Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike drank glasses of milk during their press conferences.

All these efforts are made to avoid a huge waste of milk. Government statistics have been quoted in news reports indicating that Japan is planning a huge milk wastage of 5,000 tonnes this winter.

Japanese farmers have joined forces to prevent this waste. They have made a commitment to buy 1 liter of milk from December 25 to January 3. They draw attention to their efforts via social media using the hashtag # 1Lperday.

The dairy industry and giants have also stepped up. The Lawson Inc convenience store chain is offering a 50 percent discount on a steaming cup of hot milk. They target New Years celebrations and offer the discount on December 31st and January 1st.

Meiji Holdings Company, a giant in the dairy industry has taken a step forward. He roped Saori Yoshida, an Olympic wrestling champion and leading a campaign to increase milk consumption

The reason behind it all

Japan experiences lower demand for milk at this time of year. Schoolchildren are usually given boxes of milk in Japan. However, with the children at home due to the holiday season all over the country, a huge amount of milk is not used.

On top of that, large retailers are closing temporarily at this time of year.

The Covid pandemic has added another dimension to this. While the hospitality industry is still recovering from the recession, demand for milk is slow in this sector.


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