Japan drink – NSMS 10 http://nsms10.com/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 10:42:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nsms10.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-71-150x150.png Japan drink – NSMS 10 http://nsms10.com/ 32 32 Mochi ice cream is the big cold https://nsms10.com/mochi-ice-cream-is-the-big-cold/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 08:00:08 +0000 https://nsms10.com/mochi-ice-cream-is-the-big-cold/ YesA few years ago, I had my first manju, a traditional Japanese confectionery, at Benkyodo, a shop in the Japanese district of San Francisco. It was mochi manju – sweet sticky rice (that’s the mochi part) around an even sweeter red bean filling. I thought it was delicious, but the combination of the gum from […]]]>

YesA few years ago, I had my first manju, a traditional Japanese confectionery, at Benkyodo, a shop in the Japanese district of San Francisco. It was mochi manju – sweet sticky rice (that’s the mochi part) around an even sweeter red bean filling. I thought it was delicious, but the combination of the gum from the mochi rice and the grain from the bean mash isn’t for everyone. In the 1987 independent film Live on Tokyo time, directed by Oscar-winning filmmaker Steven Okazaki, the hero, Ken, an overassimilated third-generation Japanese-American like me, walks into a candy store just like Benkyodo looking for a jelly donut and is offered a manju in place. “That sounds weird,” Ken said. “I would prefer a donut.”

This article appears in the Fall 2022 issue of Alta Journal.
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Michael Schwab

Although Japanese food items like sushi and ramen can be found almost anywhere, manju remains a culinary exception, even among many Japanese Americans. For many dessert lovers in the United States, its main meaning is to inspire the national sensation that is mochi ice cream. In the early 1990s, Frances Hashimoto, head of Mikawaya, a Los Angeles-based manju confectionery, began tweaking the traditional recipe into a more accessible dessert. She replaced the traditional red bean paste with scoops of ice cream, and mochi ice cream was born.

The original Mikawaya store in Little Tokyo had been owned by Hashimoto’s family since William Howard Taft was president. The confectionery served traditional handmade desserts with lines dating back to the 14th century. Hashimoto was born in 1943 in the Japanese-American internment camp in Poston, Arizona, and grew up in Boyle Heights in Los Angeles, then a Japanese-American enclave. A graduate of the University of Southern California and a former elementary school teacher, she probably had a lot of Kens in mind when she created mochi ice cream.

It was a pretty radical idea at the time. Few non-Japanese Americans had even heard of mochi. And why would you want to ruin a perfect scoop of French vanilla by wrapping it in a thick skin of sticky sweet rice? Beyond the weirdness of the combo, there were the logistics to consider: how do you fill the mochi before the ice cream melts without all that sticky rice sticking to your fingers? (Answer: Move quickly, and cornstarch.)

Hashimoto devised the frozen concoction with the help of her husband, Joel Friedman, who came up with the idea while on a trip to Japan. In the mid-1990s, they began selling the candy at Mikawaya’s flagship store, where it became a top seller.

Mochi ice cream transformed Mikawaya into a dessert destination in Little Tokyo, a generation before boba shops, Taiwanese pastry shops and Hawaiian shave ice vendors took over big city neighborhoods and shopping malls in the suburbs. Shortly after moving to Los Angeles, when looking for a sweet treat at the Japanese Village Plaza, there were imagawayaki — red bean cakes served hot on the griddle — at Mitsuru Café, Mikawaya’s mochi ice cream, and not much else. If it was hot outside, the choice was clear.

melted mochi ice cream

Andrea D’Agosto

At first, Mikawaya’s mochi ice cream offerings were limited to your American standards (chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry) and Japanese favorites (green tea and, perhaps in a nod to manju roots, red bean). Before long, however, the company added more flavors to the mix, including plum wine, black sesame, and matcha.

Hashimoto’s creation was so lucrative that three years after his death in 2012, a private equity firm purchased the company. Originally sold in Mikawaya stores in American cities with large Asian populations, such as Torrance and Gardena in Southern California and Honolulu, Mikawaya mochi ice cream can now be found on the freezer shelves of Japanese grocery chains like Nijiya and Marukai as well as Whole Foods, Target, and Trader Joe’s. Alas, the original Little Tokyo flagship store closed in 2021, after 111 years in business. (Unfortunately, after 115 years in San Francisco, Benkyodo also closed in March of this year.)

As part of the late 80s Live on Tokyo time, Ken has two options in this confectionery: jelly donut or manju. And whoever he chooses has cultural implications, especially for the manju-shop guy (played by Lane Nishikawa, a fellow third-generation Japanese who was also the artistic director of San Francisco’s groundbreaking Asian American Theater Company). What kind of Japanese would eat a jelly donut when they could choose a manju? In the end, Ken is persuaded to choose the manju and isn’t very happy about it. Today, of course, he could have mochi ice cream and live in the best of both worlds.•

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Imam Bayildi Refreshing Turkish Stuffed Eggplant https://nsms10.com/imam-bayildi-refreshing-turkish-stuffed-eggplant/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://nsms10.com/imam-bayildi-refreshing-turkish-stuffed-eggplant/ The Yomiuri ShimbunImam bayildi cold turkish stuffed eggplant By Yumi Miyaki / Editor Yomiuri Shimbun 12:00 JST, September 24, 2022 Although it’s the season for delicious summer vegetables, they tend to be cooked the same way all the time. Here, traveling cooking expert Asami Kuchio shares her recipe for a cold version of Turkish stuffed […]]]>
The Yomiuri Shimbun
Imam bayildi cold turkish stuffed eggplant

Although it’s the season for delicious summer vegetables, they tend to be cooked the same way all the time. Here, traveling cooking expert Asami Kuchio shares her recipe for a cold version of Turkish stuffed eggplant. It is an exotic dish full of the natural and distinctive flavor of the vegetables used.

The name of this home-style dish —imam bayldi—which is loved by many Turks, means “so delicious imam [Muslim leader] fainted.

Many people associate Turkish cuisine with meat dishes like shish kebab, but Kuchio said, “Many Turkish dishes are made with lots of vegetables, such as eggplant and tomato.

For example, a thick tomato paste called “salca” is like miso in Japan in that it’s used in all kinds of dishes in Turkey. Tomato paste is also used in this eggplant dish as a sauce.

Eggplants should be removed from the oil when their surface becomes soft as it is difficult to stuff them with vegetables when they are over fried and soggy. “The eggplants will continue to cook with the residual heat. You don’t have to worry about cooking them completely because they’ll be baked later,” Kuchio said.

The stuffing uses onions, tomatoes, shishito peppers and Italian parsley. Green chilies can be used instead of shishito chilies if you like them spicy. Then add cayenne pepper, cumin and other spices and herbs to add flavor, and cook until the water in the vegetables has reduced. Make a slit in the aubergines and stuff them with the vegetables, then place them in a baking dish with the tomato paste diluted with water. Finally, roast them in the oven.

Kuchio said the dish tasted better if refrigerated, so I left it in the fridge overnight before eating it. I couldn’t help but smile as my mouth was filled with cold juices, rich in delicious vegetable flavors, as well as the aroma of cumin. This is a dish for anyone who loves eggplant.

Salted yogurt drink


The Yomiuri Shimbun
Salted yogurt ayran drink

Along with tomato, yogurt is a common ingredient in Turkish cuisine. Kuchio makes a salty yogurt drink called “ayran”.

To prepare the drink, simply mix plain yogurt with water and salt. “As the thickness and flavor of the drink is a personal preference, the amount of water and salt can be freely adjusted,” she said. It tastes refreshing and is perfect for this time of year.

imam cold bayildi

Ingredients (for 2-3 people):

  • 4 to 6 eggplants
  • 1 onion
  • 2 to 3 shishito peppers
  • 1 tomato
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1 tablespoon chopped Italian parsley
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • ½ tbsp dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • Directions:

1. Peel the eggplants in three sections lengthwise, leaving the ends. Fry in oil at medium temperature.


The Yomiuri Shimbun
Eggplants are fried in oil.

2. Thinly slice the onion, chop the shishito peppers and garlic, and coarsely chop the tomato. Heat the olive oil in a frying pan and sauté the onion until soft. Add the shishito peppers, tomato, garlic, Italian parsley, ½ teaspoon of salt, a pinch of pepper, cayenne pepper, basil and cumin. Simmer until it becomes thick.

3. When the eggplants have cooled enough to handle, cut them in the middle and stuff them with the vegetable mixture.


The Yomiuri Shimbun
Eggplants are split in the middle after cooling.

4. Mix the tomato paste with 100 milliliters of water and put in a baking dish. Place the aubergines in the dish and cook in the oven at 200 C for 15-20 minutes.

5. Refrigerate dish, drizzle with additional olive oil and sprinkle with chopped Italian parsley.

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Sauce Magazine – First Look: Saturn Lounge on Cherokee Street in St. Louis https://nsms10.com/sauce-magazine-first-look-saturn-lounge-on-cherokee-street-in-st-louis/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 21:52:30 +0000 https://nsms10.com/sauce-magazine-first-look-saturn-lounge-on-cherokee-street-in-st-louis/ First Look: Saturn Lounge on Cherokee Street in St. Louis By Iain Shaw // September 21, 2022 Saturn Lounge is a unique new entry on Cherokee Street, equal parts cocktail bar and listening lounge. The bar, which is co-owned by KDHX DJ Doug Morgan, is located at 1915 Cherokee St. in South City. The Saturn […]]]>

First Look: Saturn Lounge on Cherokee Street in St. Louis

Saturn Lounge is a unique new entry on Cherokee Street, equal parts cocktail bar and listening lounge. The bar, which is co-owned by KDHX DJ Doug Morgan, is located at 1915 Cherokee St. in South City.

The Saturn Lounge is housed in an attractive free-standing building set back a bit from the street, allowing for a street-side patio, rare among nearby venues. The bar’s charming interior is the result of a two-and-a-half-year rehab, with attention to detail evident in many design features, from the lighting and furnishings to the mix of artwork art. “We probably looked at 300 lights before settling on these,” Morgan said. The entire site has an interior capacity of 49 people, with five cabins in the forward saloon and 10 stools at the bar. Larger groups can sit in the back room, centered around a large sofa.

Some eagle-eyed patrons might recognize the main bar, which was salvaged from the old Balaban’s in the Central West End. “My partner was walking down the street when they were demonstrating the place, and he worked there as a bus boy 30 years ago,” Morgan said. “They said, ‘If you can get it out of here, it’s up to you. He sawed it off, then we put it back together. The back room cabins were also salvaged from Balaban when it closed.

Morgan has been a DJ on KDHX for 32 years, along with former co-owners of bars such as Boogaloo and the now closed Delmar Restaurant & Lounge. His show, The Record Sto’, airs from 2 to 4 p.m. on Thursdays. Morgan said his idea for a listening lounge was partly inspired by the Kissaten culture that flourished in Japan in the aftermath of World War II. Kissaten were nominally teahouses, but are often closely associated with coffee in Japan. Before record players were a common household item, the local kissaten was the place to go to listen to new music, including overseas imports. “There was usually a guy in there pouring tea or maybe whiskey and playing records,” Morgan said.

At the Saturn Lounge, Morgan is that guy who “reads the mood” to lead guests on a distinct and eclectic musical adventure. Morgan is happy to discuss music with customers, but reserves the right to refuse requests. “It’s not a jukebox,” he said. Instrumental to the vision is a crystal-clear audio system, whose bass rumbles pleasantly without drowning out the conversation. “You go to a lot of places and maybe there’s good music, maybe not, but whatever music is playing, it tends to be mostly in the background, just wallpaper , or it’s too strong,” he said. “Good quality sound doesn’t have to be so loud.”

Even in the early days of the bar, the cocktail menu evolved based on customer feedback. Morgan said current favorites include Violet Fizz (gin, violet liqueur, simple syrup and soda) and Bolero (pineapple-jalapeno tequila, mezcal, cilantro liqueur and pineapple), plus an off-menu ginger mojito. . A total of seven cocktails are listed on the menu, but any standard cocktail is available on request. The bar also offers eight wines by the glass, a figure that Morgan says is set to rise. A wide selection of draft, canned, and bottled beers is dominated by local beers, and the non-alcoholic beverage list includes NA beers and alcohol alternatives as well as Sump cold ale.

Food will be added to Saturn Lounge offerings “hopefully within six months,” Morgan said. The kitchen will be located in an adjacent building and Morgan said he is considering a menu that will focus on small plates. “A bit upscale, but approachable,” he said.

Saturn Lounge opens at 3 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday with a closing time depending on the crowd. “On weekdays there have been nights at 10 p.m. where the place empties out, but if there are still people hanging around, we will stay open,” Morgan said.

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Houston’s First Cannabis-Centric Dining Experience Opens in Montrose https://nsms10.com/houstons-first-cannabis-centric-dining-experience-opens-in-montrose/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 21:41:16 +0000 https://nsms10.com/houstons-first-cannabis-centric-dining-experience-opens-in-montrose/ In a city as big as Houston, it goes without saying that there are plenty of fun dining options for residents who suffer from food cravings. But until now, there hasn’t been a single full-service restaurant in Houston where you can go to actually obtain food cravings — not to mention, of […]]]>



In a city as big as Houston, it goes without saying that there are plenty of fun dining options for residents who suffer from food cravings. But until now, there hasn’t been a single full-service restaurant in Houston where you can go to actually obtain food cravings — not to mention, of course, any surreptitious smoke that might occur in a restaurant parking lot before someone’s meal. That all changes today with the opening of Wild Montrose (1609 Westheimer), which now offers Houstonians the city’s first fully legal cannabis dining experience.

The restaurant is the latest project from hemp entrepreneurs and cousins ​​Adyson and Andrew Alvis, who are the minds behind CBD coffee and dispensary Grinder’s Coffee Bar at West University and the first Wild, an upscale cafe, bar, lounge inspired by Bali. , and boutique dispensary, located in the Heights.

The Alvises are among the leading innovators on the cannabis hospitality side of our state, which still has some pretty draconian cannabis laws on the books, and Wild Montrose is a testament to how skillfully the Avises have been able to navigate those sometimes nebulous laws. For their latest venture, the hemp entrepreneurs teamed up with Houston-based executive chef German Mosquera, a seasoned veteran of the city’s hospitality scene who is also prone to innovation himself, like when the celebrity vegan chef updated the menu of Five now gone. at La Colombe d’Or in 2013 to be more vegan and vegetarian.




Per Texas law, Wild Montrose is permitted to use cannabis products that remain below 0.3% Delta-9, which, unlike Delta-8, is derived from actual cannabis plants instead of hemp, in their food and beverage offerings. Part of the challenge that Mosquera and the Alvises face when it comes to dosing restaurant consumables is that they have to make sure they stay within strict legal limits. As a result, the hemp vendors at Wild Montrose (Mosquera likes to call them “super bartenders”) will have to do quite a bit of math for every table that wants an infused experience.

“It’s very layered. We provide different ingredients that are dosed to enhance different dishes. We pre-dose the dishes based on the agent we use to dose,” says Mosquera. “There’s been a lot of math and a lot of science to make sure it’s safe because you can only legally serve someone a certain number of doses of THC or CBD before you can green them. It may sound scary, but we have done a lot of work and continue to work with these types of foods and infusions to provide the best experience for everyone.

“We’re not going to overdose people,” he continues.




When it comes to the food at Wild Montrose, Mosquera, a Culinary Institute of America-trained chef who studied with master chefs in America and Europe, has used his more than 18 years of experience in the kitchen to deliver a menu in Houston. diners who will take them on a culinary journey through the various coastal regions of the world, in addition to dosing them with CBD and THC if they wish.

“We are not tied to the beaches here or in Mexico or South America; we are inspired by the beaches of South Africa, France, Japan,” says Mosquera of his inspiration for the cuisine at Wild Montrose, which he takes as a reference to international coastal cuisine. “We experiment with all these different flavors without being pigeonholed into one style.”

Several dishes from Wild Montrose’s highly creative menu promise to become fast favourites, including small plate options such as scallop tom yam goong, a creamy sweet and sour soup from Thailand served by Mosquera with red-hued sticky rice. infused with watermelon juice and coconut milk. There’s also a spin on migas on the brunch menu featuring chorizo ​​made from Iberian pork (an ultra-salty dish inspired by Mosquera’s culinary training in Spain) that looks promising, in addition big shares on the restaurant’s dinner menu that we’re super excited about, like Wagyu Beef Rib Eye (slaughtered on the spot), Thai Crispy Fish, and Japanese BBQ.

All restaurant menu items are offered with the option of being served “virgin” or dosed and infused with CBD or THC. Pre-dosed edibles and sweets are also on the menu, as are creative desserts like Hoja Santa ice cream, which includes marzipan, nixta caramel and homemade caviar.




Outside of food, Wild Montrose offers coffee and cocktail programs similar to those at its Heights location. THC-free cocktail options at the restaurant include breezy tropical offerings like the Pandan Coolada, a funky mix of Pot Sill Rum, pineapple, pandan, and lime; the bright and boozy Okinawa Old Fashioned made with Japanese plum whiskey, yuzu and lemon; and the Glazed & Confused, a decadent coffee cocktail made with dark rum, cream, chocolate liqueur, coconut, and espresso.

The restaurant also offers non-alcoholic hemp-infused elixirs such as the tangy and refreshing Hanoi Lo Fi, the sweet and creamy Maui Mango, and the sweet and sour Pink Loco. There are also plenty of wine and beer options available at the restaurant if you’re looking for a more traditional type of buzz and don’t want to get too wild.

Wild Montrose will be open from 8 a.m. to midnight daily, serving brunch until 3 p.m. and dinner from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.

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The weak yen era should be a boom time for robots https://nsms10.com/the-weak-yen-era-should-be-a-boom-time-for-robots/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 04:00:51 +0000 https://nsms10.com/the-weak-yen-era-should-be-a-boom-time-for-robots/ After months of defiant forecasts, the yen ended last week with a near-vertical plunge below its belt and a glimmer of more craziness to come. The Japanese authorities have opened their playbook to the page on bogus interventions. A glut of central bank announcements next week should reignite the turmoil. It might be a tough […]]]>

After months of defiant forecasts, the yen ended last week with a near-vertical plunge below its belt and a glimmer of more craziness to come. The Japanese authorities have opened their playbook to the page on bogus interventions. A glut of central bank announcements next week should reignite the turmoil.

It might be a tough time to be a forex analyst, but it looks like a brilliant time to be a Japanese robot.

The yen’s sharp fall against the dollar this year has highlighted some pressing questions about Asia’s largest developed economy. Japan is a resource-poor country that imports most of its energy, food, and raw materials; he allowed wages to stagnate for two decades and must now protect a declining and aging population that has largely forgotten the pain of inflation; its companies have moved nearly 40% of their manufacturing capacity overseas since 1995, muddling the question of whether a weak yen is fundamentally good or bad for industry.

But those uncertainties increasingly look like factors that are pushing Japan far more decisively to the brink of its next robotic revolution — an even more heartfelt embrace of automation that could serve as a model (or, if trial and error, warning) for South Korea, China and other economies where labor markets look set to tighten indefinitely.

The simplest argument lies in the exchange rate itself: not the lowest the yen has reached in recent weeks, but the 50-year low at which the real effective exchange rate of the yen (a weighted rate based on exchange adjusted for inflation) stands.

The economics suggests that this cheapness should be a trigger for Japanese companies to bring production back to shore. There is already evidence of such measures: several clothing manufacturers have recently declared that they will bring production of high-end products home due to the weak yen. Japanese companies are jointly investing with Taiwanese chipmaker TSMC in a $7 billion factory in southern Japan that has become a benchmark for relocation in the era of weak yen.

The hurdle facing such plans is the tiny unused capacity of the Japanese labor market. The only way to make such a project work is if it is built to operate with an absolute minimum of human personnel.

In theory at least, this means a boon for industrial automation specialists and producers of industrial robots. The problem, however, is that for now, there are overwhelming signs that most Japanese manufacturers are far from being in relocation mode with robots.

In fact, Japanese manufacturers seem more eager to push even more capacity overseas, as they now view proximity to customers as more critical than yen competitiveness. Days after the United States enacted its Cut Inflation Act last month, Toyota, Panasonic, Honda and other giants collectively announced $20 billion in new US-based factories. Tax incentives established by law encourage others to follow.

But a second, more powerful set of currency-related forces, combined with demographic decline, still point firmly to Japan’s robotic future. As the yen tumbled and the country began to reopen after the pandemic, many noted how cheap Japan (especially its fabulous restaurants) looks like to the outside world.

But while the weak yen, a $12 plate of high-end sushi and a tourist’s delight cast a timely spotlight on Japanese prices, the underlying good market has been brewing for decades – those long decades. of unraised wages and deflation that weighed on the wallets of suppliers and consumers of that first-class lunch.

The problem for Japan, which companies are now clearly foreseeing, is that the permanent wage suppression, combined with a now structurally weak yen, will make it difficult to offset long-term population decline by attracting large-scale immigration.

The yen doesn’t have much to go down anymore, says Monex adviser and economist Jesper Koll, before a high-end nurse in Manila earns more than an entry-level nurse in Tokyo. For sectors like healthcare and construction, where robots are clearly not ready to take over, the outlook is troubling. Elsewhere, however, the situation portends a golden era of automation.

Last month, Family Mart, Japan’s second-largest convenience store chain, began introducing on-shelf packing machines that have finally mastered the vital task of ensuring beverage bottle labels are all exactly facing forward. Armed with this skill, the minimum number of human employees in each Family Mart branch can now be halved. The robots are coming.

leo.lewis@ft.com

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U.S. Air Force Base Tokyo Rejects Chromium Contamination Allegation, Says Water is Safe to Drink https://nsms10.com/u-s-air-force-base-tokyo-rejects-chromium-contamination-allegation-says-water-is-safe-to-drink/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 14:06:31 +0000 https://nsms10.com/u-s-air-force-base-tokyo-rejects-chromium-contamination-allegation-says-water-is-safe-to-drink/ Sept. 15 – YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan – Authorities at this airlift hub in western Tokyo have dismissed as false a claim circulating on social media that the base’s water supply may be contaminated with chromium VI, or hexavalent chromium, a carcinogen. The 374th Civil Engineer Squadron, responding to a Facebook discussion on Tuesday about […]]]>

Sept. 15 – YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan – Authorities at this airlift hub in western Tokyo have dismissed as false a claim circulating on social media that the base’s water supply may be contaminated with chromium VI, or hexavalent chromium, a carcinogen.

The 374th Civil Engineer Squadron, responding to a Facebook discussion on Tuesday about the chromium report, said the water at Yokota Air Force Base is safe to drink and no chromium was detected during the 2021 water quality survey.

“Chromium was considered non-detectable and was not listed as a contaminant. Our water is safe to drink,” the squadron’s message read. Separately, he said: “Chromium is not listed. Because it is not detected.”

The chromium contamination report, first posted on the Air Force amn/nco/snco Facebook page Aug. 24, is not true, a 374th Airlift Wing spokesperson told the Stars and Stripes by phone on September 7.

“There is a system in place to prevent the very concern that the individual has raised,” 1st Lt. Danny Rangel said. He said the Aircraft Maintenance Division, the alleged source of contamination at Yokota, “did due diligence” and dismissed the contamination claim.

On Wednesday, Rangel provided a statement from the wing: “Yokota Air Force Base continues to conduct its operations with careful consideration for the safety of our members, our surrounding community, and our environment,” his email read.

“In an effort to enhance the public’s understanding of our water systems, the facility publishes an annual Drinking Water Quality Report, which summarizes the quality of water provided by Yokota Air Base.”

The first anonymous post on Air Force amn/nco/snco on Aug. 24 described how power sanding the exteriors of the C-130J Super Hercules, 374th transport aircraft, over the past 10 years has released hexavalent chromium into the air. air, after which it found its way into soil and groundwater. Undated photographs and an undated four-second video accompanying the message show airmen in protective gear, on an elevator, spraying a Super Hercules in Yokota as a cloud lifts from the plane.

“As of 2012, there is a memorandum that authorizes Yokota Air Force Base to perform chromium (VI) compound sanding operations in an outdoor environment,” the post said. “Remember that the base location not only has our service members located everywhere, but also that foreign nationals have homes and families in the immediate area.”

Hexavalent chromium causes cancer and targets the respiratory system, kidneys, liver, skin and eyes, according to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration website. It is used as an anti-corrosion agent in paint and other surface coatings.

Stars and Stripes contacted the poster through the Air Force amn/nco/snco Facebook page, but that person did not respond to questions about the alleged chromium contamination.

A second post on the amn/nco/snco page on August 26 stated, “They told us that Chromium VI levels have quadrupled over the last 6 years in Yokota’s water supply and if it reaches a certain point they will shut off all the water for the base they told us they wont fix it until its too late. [civil engineering] goes to the Japanese government to have a soil sample taken from where we blasted.”

The Northern Kanto Defense Bureau, a branch of Japan’s Defense Ministry, on August 31 and Japan’s Environment Ministry on September 1 told Stars and Stripes by phone that they had no trace. of a request to take soil samples in Yokota. .

“If there are high levels, the group will have to pay all damages for contamination,” the August 26 message continued. “Bio says Chrome VI won’t leave the 50 foot cord but how come the levels are so high now? Everyone turned a blind eye to this and nothing will change until the levels become too high.”

The post spurred discussion on the Yokota Community page on Facebook, an online forum where base residents raise community issues.

“Any news on water quality issues that have been reported recently? commentator Felisa Leppo posted on Monday. “Does anyone know where we can get whole house filtration systems for basic housing? Or at minimum RO for kitchen and shower/bath filtration that can handle chromeVI?”

This post generated more than 40 comments. Civil Engineering Squadron responded with their comments and a link to the 2021 water quality report, which contains no reference to chromium in the water supply.

Stars and Stripes reporter Hana Kusumoto contributed to this report.

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(c)2022 stars and stripes

Visit the Stars and Stripes at www.stripes.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Perth’s Latest in Food and Drink News – 14 September 2022 https://nsms10.com/perths-latest-in-food-and-drink-news-14-september-2022/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 10:06:23 +0000 https://nsms10.com/perths-latest-in-food-and-drink-news-14-september-2022/ More reasons to love everyone’s favorite Japanese coffee The good news: Fremantle’s Hinata Cafe, Tomoe Echo’s perfect homage to Japan’s kissatens (cafes), has switched to a spring menu featuring warmer treats such as sanshoku (tricolor) rice, an eggplant open sandwich with miso and ume sodas. The real good news? The café no longer offers a […]]]>

More reasons to love everyone’s favorite Japanese coffee

The good news: Fremantle’s Hinata Cafe, Tomoe Echo’s perfect homage to Japan’s kissatens (cafes), has switched to a spring menu featuring warmer treats such as sanshoku (tricolor) rice, an eggplant open sandwich with miso and ume sodas. The real good news? The café no longer offers a menu only on weekends: all dishes and drinks – including Hinata’s very excellent okonomiyaki (savory pancake) – are now available every day the café is open. Happy days, Freo.

More adventures in Malaysian cuisine

This also comes from the new menu department: Two Hands Noodle Shop in Como has also added new dishes to its repertoire of East Malaysian cuisine. These newcomers include noodles served with black bean braised pork ribs; hor fun served with your choice of meat or seafood; and a special nasi lemak featuring fried chicken with the usual peanut, anchovy, cucumber and sambal suspects.

A tasting of Spanish wines by the sea

Sofia Giros, sommelier at Cottesloe’s Indigo Oscar, has returned from a trip to Spain and is delighted to share the wines of her native country with her guests. Held on three different Friday nights (September 30, October 14, and October 28), Vino con Amigos is a seven-wine journey that includes Catalan vermouth, Basque txakoli, as well as young and old Rioja. Each 90-minute tasting includes snacks and commentary from Giros. Tickets are $75 per person and are available online.

Thoughts on the September 22 holiday

“A lost day of trade has a huge impact on a small business because not only is it unsustainable to operate with the labor costs involved, but the loss of revenue is also more acutely felt.” “Hospo can’t really take a break right now.” “We are closing because the city empties on a public holiday.” “Always happy to pay extra for a holiday – great respect for companies and their staff who provide us with great times on holiday!” Here are some of the comments on social media from hotel business owners and customers following the instant announcement of the September 22 public holiday and the public holiday wages and (potential) surcharges that will come into effect on same day. While everyone will have to navigate their own day, can I afford to pay public holiday rates to my staff and open? Should I or shouldn’t I pass this surcharge on to customers? As a diner, can I afford to pay holiday supplements? – this whole situation reminds us of how difficult the landscape is for hospitality right now. (Regardless of the current skills shortage and rising cost of goods plaguing businesses.) It’s also a great time to remind ourselves – as diners – that a little patience goes a long way, we we may have to wait a little longer for food and drinks, and that we should always be kind and generous to those who show up and might be having a hard day at the office.

A halal food festival is coming to Perth

Urban Pop Ups is hosting the next installment of their Halal Food and Produce Market on Sunday October 9th at the University of WA. Confirmed vendors that day include Greek fusion food truck Opa Opa Perth and Knafeh by Omar, a baker specializing in Palestinian desserts made with thin kataifi dough and Nabulsi cheese.

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Shoji Morimoto charges $102 per reservation to accompany customers and simply exist as a companion in Tokyo https://nsms10.com/shoji-morimoto-charges-102-per-reservation-to-accompany-customers-and-simply-exist-as-a-companion-in-tokyo/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 19:21:56 +0000 https://nsms10.com/shoji-morimoto-charges-102-per-reservation-to-accompany-customers-and-simply-exist-as-a-companion-in-tokyo/ Shoji Morimoto has what some consider a dream job: he gets paid to do nothing. The 38-year-old Tokyo resident charges 10,000 yen ($102) per reservation to accompany customers and simply exist as a companion. “Basically, I rent myself. My job is to be where my clients want me to be and not do anything in […]]]>

Shoji Morimoto has what some consider a dream job: he gets paid to do nothing.

The 38-year-old Tokyo resident charges 10,000 yen ($102) per reservation to accompany customers and simply exist as a companion.

“Basically, I rent myself. My job is to be where my clients want me to be and not do anything in particular,” Mr Morimoto told Reuters, adding that he had handled some 4,000 sessions over the course of of the last four years.

With a lanky build and average appearance, Mr Morimoto now has nearly a quarter of a million followers on Twitter, where he finds most of his customers.

About a quarter of them are regular customers, including one who has hired him 270 times.

His job took him to a park with someone who wanted to play on a swing. He also beamed and waved through a train window at a complete stranger who wanted a ride.

Customer Aruna Chida said she didn’t feel the need to chat with Mr Morimoto. (Reuters: Kim Kyung Hoon)

While such rental services are not unheard of in Japan – there are agencies where one can hire actors to be your friend or even an entire family – Mr. Morimoto’s differentiating factor is his “no-nonsense” approach. effort”, without playing any specific role.

“What I mean by doing nothing is that I eat and drink [with my clients]and I answer their simple questions with simple answers,” Morimoto said.

But doing nothing does not mean Mr. Morimoto will do anything. He refused offers to move a fridge “because it involved physical work”, a trip to Cambodia, and does not accept any requests of a sexual nature.

Last week, Mr Morimoto sat across from Aruna Chida, a 27-year-old data analyst dressed in a sari, having a sparse conversation over tea and cake.

Ms Chida wanted to wear the Indian dress in public but feared it would embarrass her friends. So she turned to Mr. Morimoto for companionship.

“With my friends, I feel that I have to entertain them, but with the renter [Mr Morimoto] I don’t feel the need to be talkative,” she said.

Before Mr Morimoto found his true calling, he worked in a publishing house and was often chastised for “doing nothing”.

“I started wondering what would happen if I provided my ability to ‘do nothing’ as a service to customers,” he said.

A skinny Japanese man in a white t-shirt, baseball cap and face mask poses on a busy zebra crossing in Japan.
Morimoto believes his work can change society’s attitude that you always have to do something productive to feel valued.(Reuters: Kim Kyung Hoon)

The companionship business is now Mr. Morimoto’s only source of income, on which he supports his wife and child.

Although he declined to divulge how much he earned, he said he sees about one or two clients a day. Before the pandemic, it was three or four a day.

As he spent a Wednesday doing nothing remarkable in Tokyo, Mr Morimoto reflected on the bizarre nature of his job and seemed to question a society that values ​​productivity and scoffs at pointlessness.

“People tend to think my ‘doing nothing’ is valuable because it’s helpful (for others)… But it’s okay to do nothing. People don’t need to be helpful d ‘a specific way,’ he said.

Reuters

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Top Tipples: Campari’s Negroni Week, ready-to-drink deals from Strong Zero and Horoyoi https://nsms10.com/top-tipples-camparis-negroni-week-ready-to-drink-deals-from-strong-zero-and-horoyoi/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://nsms10.com/top-tipples-camparis-negroni-week-ready-to-drink-deals-from-strong-zero-and-horoyoi/ Celebrate Negroni Week With its bitter mix of gin, vermouth and Campari, the Negroni is not exactly a beginner’s cocktail. But this year’s Negroni Week – now in its 10th edition – promises to deconstruct and reinvent the purple Italian concoction to suit a range of palates. It starts with a party at Caffe Fernet […]]]>

Celebrate Negroni Week

With its bitter mix of gin, vermouth and Campari, the Negroni is not exactly a beginner’s cocktail. But this year’s Negroni Week – now in its 10th edition – promises to deconstruct and reinvent the purple Italian concoction to suit a range of palates.

It starts with a party at Caffe Fernet in Collyer Quay on Sunday 11 September, which includes a ‘Battle of Negroni’ where Italian bartenders from the Jigger & Pony bar group will compete to whip up the best version of the cocktail.

Ten of the best bars in Singapore also offered their version of the drink called Negroni Handshakes. They include the Black Forest Negroni ($25++) at 28 HongKong Street, which uses rum and sweet Ruby Port wine to tone down the bitterness of a classic Negroni.

Patrons of the Opus Bar & Grill in Orchard Road can also win a year’s supply of the steakhouse’s Negroni. Drop by his Campari photo booth on your next visit and tag @opusbarandgrill and #NegroniWeekOpusBarandGrill in your snap. One lucky winner will receive free portions of Negroni for subsequent visits until next September.

Information: Negroni Week runs from September 12-19 at approximately 60 participating locations. Go to https://str.sg/wzyg

The humble chuhai — a sochu soda, a typical Japanese liquor distilled from barley or sweet potato — offers an easy, sweet drink.

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Japan’s largest hotel and entertainment complex to open in Kabukicho in 2023 https://nsms10.com/japans-largest-hotel-and-entertainment-complex-to-open-in-kabukicho-in-2023/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 05:13:37 +0000 https://nsms10.com/japans-largest-hotel-and-entertainment-complex-to-open-in-kabukicho-in-2023/ Tokyo is constantly changing and evolving, and it can be a bit overwhelming to keep up with all the new and upcoming attractions. There’s a lot to look forward to in 2023, including the new teamLab Borderless in the center of Tokyo, Harry Potter attraction, and this entertainment complex in Shinjuku’s bustling Kabukicho district. Called […]]]>

Tokyo is constantly changing and evolving, and it can be a bit overwhelming to keep up with all the new and upcoming attractions. There’s a lot to look forward to in 2023, including the new teamLab Borderless in the center of Tokyo, Harry Potter attraction, and this entertainment complex in Shinjuku’s bustling Kabukicho district. Called on Tokyo Kabukicho Towerthis new building will be the largest hotel and entertainment complex in Japan, housing a cinema, two luxury hotels, a concert hall, a food hall and much more.

To call the space massive is an understatement. The skyscraper comprises a total of 48 floors plus five basement levels and a penthouse. Here’s a look at some of the upcoming facilities at this Kabukicho entertainment hub.

Live music room ZeppTokyo in Odaiba closed earlier this year, but has found a new home at Tokyu Kabukicho Tower. Levels one through four of the basement will be dedicated to the new music space, with a capacity of approximately 1,500 people, the largest among Shinjuku’s concert halls.

Photo: Tokyo

The second floor is a entertainment catering hall, which combines gastronomy and music in a festive atmosphere. Restaurant tenants have yet to be announced, but you can expect ten food and drink vendors serving regional Japanese cuisines. The food hall will also be equipped with a stage, DJ booth, disco ball, karaoke system and LED lights.

Tokyo Kabukicho Tower
Photo: Tokyo

On the third floor you will find the Bandai Namco Entertainment Center. There will be more dining options here as well as space for events and experiences featuring popular anime, manga and video game characters from the Bandai Namco family.

Tokyo Kabukicho Tower
Photo: Tokyo

The fourth and fifth floors will have more entertainment options, including a high-tech Sony Music attraction and a wellness area with a gym, private sauna and pool deck.

Floors six to eight will house Milano Za Theatera state-of-the-art performance stage that can accommodate approximately 900 people.

Tokyo Kabukicho Tower
Photo: Tokyo

Floors nine and ten will be the 109 Shinjuku Premium Cinemas with a total of eight screens. The cinema is said to present the first panoramic ScreenX in Shinjuku.

The new tower will house two new luxury hotels: Hotel Groove Shinjuku from floors 18 to 38 and Bellustar Tokyo on floors 39 to 47. Just below the hotels, on the 17th floor, you will find a restaurant, a bar and a terrace. The Bellustar Tokyo Hotel is particularly stunning, as the rooms are perched 170 meters above the ground. The hotel also has its own restaurant and spa as well as a three-story atrium with stunning views of Tokyo.

Tokyo Kabukicho Tower
Photo: Tokyo

More information about Tokyu Kabukicho Tower here.

More from Time Out Tokyo

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Here are the new entry rules for Japan from September 7 – including for tourists

Enjoy up to 48% off at luxury Hoshino hotels in and around Tokyo

Sayonara teamLab Borderless – we’ll see you in 2023

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