83-year-old Japanese Kenichi Horie becomes the oldest person to cross the Pacific solo non-stop

Photo: AP

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Kenichi Horie arrived in the Kii Strait off the west coast of Japan, completing his 69-day trans-Pacific journey on Saturday
  • He became the first person in the world to complete a non-stop solo voyage across the Pacific from Japan to San Francisco in 1962.
  • Kenichi does not physically train for his adventures.

An 83-year-old Japanese man has become the oldest person to cross the Pacific solo non-stop.
Kenichi Horie arrived in the Kii Strait off the west coast of Japan, completing his 69-day trans-Pacific journey on Saturday.
Popularly known as “Japan’s most famous yachtsman”, Kenichi became the first person in the world to complete a non-stop solo voyage across the Pacific from Japan to San Francisco in 1962. He was 23 at the time.

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Sixty years later, the octogenarian traveled from San Francisco to Japan to achieve the latest feat.

He left San Francisco on his sailboat, the Suntory Mermaid III, on March 27 and arrived at Cape Hinomisaki in Japan on June 4.

“I just crossed the finish line. I’m exhausted,” he wrote on his blog. after what he called a three-day battle against cross-currents in the largest and deepest ocean on earth.

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“Don’t let your dreams stay as dreams,” he told CNN. “Have a goal and work towards it and a great life awaits you.”

He called his family at least once a day to make sure they weren’t worried.

In 1962, Kenichi crossed San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge unexpectedly after 94 days at sea without a passport or money. He was arrested but soon released and granted a visa for his bravery.

Kenichi does not physically train for his adventures. “I’m still fine, still in good shape… No overeating, no overeating,” he told the San Francisco Chronicle earlier.

When asked if he had any concerns about his trip, he replied, “Nothing at all. Maybe just being old.”

Kenichi holds several Guinness World Records, including the fastest solar-powered crossing of the Pacific and the longest trip by pedalo.

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